Summary Godzilla ì PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB free



10 thoughts on “Godzilla

  1. says:

    If there’s one thing you can’t fault the Godzilla franchise for it’s the writers’ willingness to try completely new things While nearly every story will come down to a monster fight the plot themes ideas and even the Big G himself will often radically change He’s been written as a hero anti hero and villain not to mention a zombie possessed by Second World War troops and has fought everything from robot clones to cyborg space monsters As such the idea to include kaiju in a street level war between a cop trying to clear his name and a mafia boss isn’t entirely unsurprising The fact it works as well as it does however that’s where the real shock comes inSet in an amalgamated universe of the Toho and Heisei era series Gangsters and Goliaths follows the story of aged Detective Makoto Sato When his investigation of Toko’s criminal underworld gets too close to bringing up hard evidence against the Takahashi Crime Syndicate he is framed for his partners murder and sent to Monster Island to die Unfortunately for them not only does he evade his fate but manages to somehow blackmail the kaiju Mothra to assist in his war against Takahashi However Sato is playing with powers he doesn’t understand and soon everything is put at risk by his actionsAs you might have guessed from that description the comic reads like a John Woo hardboiled crime film mashed together with Godzilla Destroy All Monsters While this would usually be a recipe for disaster it manages to work here but placing emphasis upon the mythos behind Mothra and the reason for the kaijus’ existence Rather than being freak accidents or by births of accidental weapons they instead exist to create a balance between order and chaos We learn of its existence through Sato and his mistakes when he unintentionally disrupts this order As such for much of the story the kaiju are kept in the background often only seen briefly to display their raw power and foreshadow what can happen if the balance is disrupted Usually through Mothra when she’s called in by Sato in a manner similar to tactical air strikesThe lack of kaiju leaves much of the narrative’s drive to the characters and their personalities mainly Sato himself While a relatively uncomplex and straight forwards character Sato thankfully works as a protagonist due to the self awareness of the story’s clichés and the man’s likability While he is clearly driven past the point of reason he retains his morality Refusing to go through with threats to innocents when he is forced to make them and giving final chances to some in Takahashi’s payroll to walk away from it Even to those who are largely responsible for his partner’s death and unlikely to even consider doing such a thing As such while he might be on a clichéd rampage of revengance it’s still easy to sympathise with him As a whole the story reads as if John Layman is saying “What if the vengeful characters in these pulp crime comics had access to real firepower? How would they react?”The artwork seems to reflect upon the mixture of two very different genres with Alberto Ponticelli’s gritty detailed style feeling reminiscent of crime comics but shifting subtly when it comes to the kaiju themselves Turning into far detailed designs which make them stand out well from their environments and impresses how truly alien they are in a mob story Both in terms of presence and overall impact These fleeting moments of when we see them are often splash pages or little than massive scenes of description only lasting a page but it’s than enough to show how potent they areThe real problem is that the comic never really moves beyond this with the kaijuCentred upon the human characters the kaiju often feel like a means to an end when it comes to the story and are never properly focused upon Any moments of destruction glorious as they might be are fleeting and even the fights between monsters are only in the background Even in the explosive climax when the Japanese military becomes involved and multiple kaiju are rampaging across Japan we barely see them on the way to have Sato combat Takahashi The major issue with this beyond the lack of goliaths among the gangsters is that the criminals just aren’t compelling Takahashi himself is relatively flat a generic mob boss without any distinguishing traits and his two reoccurring goons seem like darker versions of Bulk and Skull than complex figures The story does mostly work in spite of them but between the second act and the final pages of the last issue it’s disappointing they’re the focus rather than Godzilla’s lotGangsters and Goliaths’ problem is that it’s so clear what it’s lacking and if it had simply added a bit focus onto the monsters this would have been a much better comic As it stands however it’s an interesting idea which works well but fails to really stand out from the crowd or make full use of its setting As a stepping on point for Godzilla comics it works showing how outlandish some of the plots can be It’s also a reasonable look into what happens with two vastly different genres collide and it works well While certainly an okay comic a perfectly enjoyable one if you like the idea it’s not a story worth going out of your way to buy


  2. says:

    This was an excellent Godzilla story set in a Tokyo crime lords era


  3. says:

    It's Godzilla Art was pretty good Story was a little light but not as bad as some of the movies Would have liked Mecha G


  4. says:

    This was a fantastic Godzilla story eual or superior to many of the films I thoroughly enjoyed it


  5. says:

    I don't particularly subscribe to the idea that Godzilla stories are only about monsters fighting I prefer a solid human story as well Gangsters and Goliaths melds together a gangstercrime story and a kaiju monster bash story and both parts work well Detective Sato's obsession is to put an end to the boss Takahashi and his organized crime family and he will do literally anything to accomplish his goal When Sato goes too far it's all of Tokyo that pays the priceIt's a very familiar set up for crime story used in dozens of movies and comics But this particular crime story just happens to take place in a world where Godzilla Mothra and the other Toho monsters exist That type of approach to Godzilla is my personal favorite Everyone accepts without further comment that kaiju exist as a natural hazard like earthuakes or typhoons Mothra has an unexpectedly prominent role and I appreciate the way she was presented The mythos around Mothra can be kind of hokey and corny in the hands of the wrong writer but here the Shobijin their relationship with Mothra and the monsters on the island are presented in a very matter of fact manner without a lot of mystical gobbledygook Everyone accepts that they have certain abilities and insights into the minds of the monsters because the evidence is right there in front of them The story is about people and is very human sized despite the larger than life action going on around them in pleasant contrast to many of the other Godzilla comics which tend to emphasize the epic action side of the euation


  6. says:

    IDW does Godzilla books so well The art is always fantastic the creature battles lots of fun and there are strong human characters to ground the story In this volume a criminal dumps a cop on monster island assuming he will be killed instead the officer gets control of a Kaiju and vows vengeance on the crime boss that wanted to kill him This was a uick enjoyable read I'll be diving into Godzilla reads on Comixology soon


  7. says:

    It's certainly a novel idea and I'm willing to believe the worlds of Japanese crime drama and kaiju could interact somehow but here the big guys just felt like props or set pieces in an extremely typical crime revenge story with a very generic villain I wasn't always thrilled by the artwork either but it at least had a coherent original style to it The panels on Monster Island itself were uite nice


  8. says:

    The artwork was good cover art was ok The storyline was a bit of a stretch but enjoyable to read


  9. says:

    Great story and art


  10. says:

    An interesting take on how humans would be able to manipulate monsters in a uest for vengeance


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Read & Download ¹ PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB free Ú John Layman

Of some most unusual friends Join superstar creators John Layman Chew and Alberto Ponticelli Unknown Soldier for this unusual and exciting mini series of monster mayhe Great story and art

Summary Godzilla

Godzilla

Detective Makoto Sato is on a uest to bring down the Takahashi crime syndicate Sato''s efforts earn him a one way trip to a tropical getaway courtesy of the Tokyo crimi If there’s one thing you can’t fault the Godzilla franchise for it’s the writers’ willingness to try completely new things While nearly every story will come down to a monster fight the plot themes ideas and even the Big G himself will often radically change He’s been written as a hero anti hero and villain not to mention a zombie possessed by Second World War troops and has fought everything from robot clones to cyborg space monsters As such the idea to include kaiju in a street level war between a cop trying to clear his name and a mafia boss isn’t entirely unsurprising The fact it works as well as it does however that’s where the real shock comes inSet in an amalgamated universe of the Toho and Heisei era series Gangsters and Goliaths follows the story of aged Detective Makoto Sato When his investigation of Toko’s criminal underworld gets too close to bringing up hard evidence against the Takahashi Crime Syndicate he is framed for his partners murder and sent to Monster Island to die Unfortunately for them not only does he evade his fate but manages to somehow blackmail the kaiju Mothra to assist in his war against Takahashi However Sato is playing with powers he doesn’t understand and soon everything is put at risk by his actionsAs you might have guessed from that description the comic reads like a John Woo hardboiled crime film mashed together with Godzilla Destroy All Monsters While this would usually be a recipe for disaster it manages to work here but placing emphasis upon the mythos behind Mothra and the reason for the kaijus’ existence Rather than being freak accidents or by births of accidental weapons they instead exist to create a balance between order and chaos We learn of its existence through Sato and his mistakes when he unintentionally disrupts this order As such for much of the story the kaiju are kept in the background often only seen briefly to display their raw power and foreshadow what can happen if the balance is disrupted Usually through Mothra when she’s called in by Sato in a manner similar to tactical air strikesThe lack of kaiju leaves much of the narrative’s drive to the characters and their personalities mainly Sato himself While a relatively uncomplex and straight forwards character Sato thankfully works as a protagonist due to the self awareness of the story’s clichés and the man’s likability While he is clearly driven past the point of reason he retains his morality Refusing to go through with threats to innocents when he is forced to make them and giving final chances to some in Takahashi’s payroll to walk away from it Even to those who are largely responsible for his partner’s death and unlikely to even consider doing such a thing As such while he might be on a clichéd rampage of revengance it’s still easy to sympathise with him As a whole the story reads as if John Layman is saying “What if the vengeful characters in these pulp crime comics had access to real firepower? How would they react?”The artwork seems to reflect upon the mixture of two very different genres with Alberto Ponticelli’s gritty detailed style feeling reminiscent of crime comics but shifting subtly when it comes to the kaiju themselves Turning into far detailed designs which make them stand out well from their environments and impresses how truly alien they are in a mob story Both in terms of presence and overall impact These fleeting moments of when we see them are often splash pages or little than massive scenes of description only lasting a page but it’s than enough to show how potent they areThe real problem is that the comic never really moves beyond this with the kaijuCentred upon the human characters the kaiju often feel like a means to an end when it comes to the story and are never properly focused upon Any moments of destruction glorious as they might be are fleeting and even the fights between monsters are only in the background Even in the explosive climax when the Japanese military becomes involved and multiple kaiju are rampaging across Japan we barely see them on the way to have Sato combat Takahashi The major issue with this beyond the lack of goliaths among the gangsters is that the criminals just aren’t compelling Takahashi himself is relatively flat a generic mob boss without any distinguishing traits and his two reoccurring goons seem like darker versions of Bulk and Skull than complex figures The story does mostly work in spite of them but between the second act and the final pages of the last issue it’s disappointing they’re the focus rather than Godzilla’s lotGangsters and Goliaths’ problem is that it’s so clear what it’s lacking and if it had simply added a bit focus onto the monsters this would have been a much better comic As it stands however it’s an interesting idea which works well but fails to really stand out from the crowd or make full use of its setting As a stepping on point for Godzilla comics it works showing how outlandish some of the plots can be It’s also a reasonable look into what happens with two vastly different genres collide and it works well While certainly an okay comic a perfectly enjoyable one if you like the idea it’s not a story worth going out of your way to buy Midnight Temptations with a Forbidden Lord (Dangerous Rogues, you can’t fault the Godzilla franchise for it’s the writers’ willingness to try completely new things While nearly every story will come down to a monster fight the plot themes ideas and even the Big G himself will often radically change He’s been written as a hero anti hero and villain not to mention a zombie possessed by Second World War troops and has fought everything from robot clones to cyborg space monsters As such the idea to include kaiju in a street level war between a cop trying to clear his name and a mafia boss isn’t entirely unsurprising The fact it works as well as it does however that’s where the real shock comes inSet in an amalgamated universe of the Toho and Heisei era series Gangsters and Goliaths follows the story of aged Detective Makoto Sato When his investigation of Toko’s criminal underworld gets too close to bringing up hard evidence against the Takahashi Crime Syndicate he is framed for his partners murder and sent to Monster Island to die Unfortunately for them not only does he evade his fate but manages to somehow blackmail the kaiju Mothra to assist in his war against Takahashi However Sato is playing with powers he doesn’t understand and soon everything is put at risk by his actionsAs Always and Forever (Blood Brothers MC you might have guessed from that description the comic reads like a John Woo hardboiled crime film mashed together with Godzilla Destroy All Monsters While this would usually be a recipe for disaster it manages to work here but placing emphasis upon the mythos behind Mothra and the reason for the kaijus’ existence Rather than being freak accidents or by births of accidental weapons they instead exist to create a balance between order and chaos We learn of its existence through Sato and his mistakes when he unintentionally disrupts this order As such for much of the story the kaiju are kept in the background often only seen briefly to display their raw power and foreshadow what can happen if the balance is disrupted Usually through Mothra when she’s called in by Sato in a manner similar to tactical air strikesThe lack of kaiju leaves much of the narrative’s drive to the characters and their personalities mainly Sato himself While a relatively uncomplex and straight forwards character Sato thankfully works as a protagonist due to the self awareness of the story’s clichés and the man’s likability While he is clearly driven past the point of reason he retains his morality Refusing to go through with threats to innocents when he is forced to make them and giving final chances to some in Takahashi’s payroll to walk away from it Even to those who are largely responsible for his partner’s death and unlikely to even consider doing such a thing As such while he might be on a clichéd rampage of revengance it’s still easy to sympathise with him As a whole the story reads as if John Layman is saying “What if the vengeful characters in these pulp crime comics had access to real firepower? How would they react?”The artwork seems to reflect upon the mixture of two very different genres with Alberto Ponticelli’s gritty detailed style feeling reminiscent of crime comics but shifting subtly when it comes to the kaiju themselves Turning into far detailed designs which make them stand out well from their environments and impresses how truly alien they are in a mob story Both in terms of presence and overall impact These fleeting moments of when we see them are often splash pages or little than massive scenes of description only lasting a page but it’s than enough to show how potent they areThe real problem is that the comic never really moves beyond this with the kaijuCentred upon the human characters the kaiju often feel like a means to an end when it comes to the story and are never properly focused upon Any moments of destruction glorious as they might be are fleeting and even the fights between monsters are only in the background Even in the explosive climax when the Japanese military becomes involved and multiple kaiju are rampaging across Japan we barely see them on the way to have Sato combat Takahashi The major issue with this beyond the lack of goliaths among the gangsters is that the criminals just aren’t compelling Takahashi himself is relatively flat a generic mob boss without any distinguishing traits and his two reoccurring goons seem like darker versions of Bulk and Skull than complex figures The story does mostly work in spite of them but between the second act and the final pages of the last issue it’s disappointing they’re the focus rather than Godzilla’s lotGangsters and Goliaths’ problem is that it’s so clear what it’s lacking and if it had simply added a bit focus onto the monsters this would have been a much better comic As it stands however it’s an interesting idea which works well but fails to really stand out from the crowd or make full use of its setting As a stepping on point for Godzilla comics it works showing how outlandish some of the plots can be It’s also a reasonable look into what happens with two vastly different genres collide and it works well While certainly an okay comic a perfectly enjoyable one if My Coyote Ugly Life (My Life, you like the idea it’s not a story worth going out of Mayday (Lovestruck Librarians, your way to buy

Read & Download ¹ PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB free Ú John Layman

Nal underworld The exotic locale? MONSTER ISLAND Alone and facing death at the hands of both gangsters and goliaths Sato must use his wits to survive and enlist the aid I don't particularly subscribe to the idea that Godzilla stories are only about monsters fighting I prefer a solid human story as well Gangsters and Goliaths melds together a gangstercrime story and a kaiju monster bash story and both parts work well Detective Sato's obsession is to put an end to the boss Takahashi and his organized crime family and he will do literally anything to accomplish his goal When Sato goes too far it's all of Tokyo that pays the priceIt's a very familiar set up for crime story used in dozens of movies and comics But this particular crime story just happens to take place in a world where Godzilla Mothra and the other Toho monsters exist That type of approach to Godzilla is my personal favorite Everyone accepts without further comment that kaiju exist as a natural hazard like earthuakes or typhoons Mothra has an unexpectedly prominent role and I appreciate the way she was presented The mythos around Mothra can be kind of hokey and corny in the hands of the wrong writer but here the Shobijin their relationship with Mothra and the monsters on the island are presented in a very matter of fact manner without a lot of mystical gobbledygook Everyone accepts that they have certain abilities and insights into the minds of the monsters because the evidence is right there in front of them The story is about people and is very human sized despite the larger than life action going on around them in pleasant contrast to many of the other Godzilla comics which tend to emphasize the epic action side of the euation