FREE READ è The ueen's Vow

SUMMARY The ueen's Vow

Hrone at stake Isabella resists the zealous demands of the inuisitor Toruemada even as she is seduced by the dreams of an enigmatic navigator named Columbus But when the Moors of the southern domain of Granada declare war a violent treacherous battle against an ancient adversary erupts one that will test all of Isabella’s resolve her courage and her tenacious belief in her destiny From the glorious palaces of Segovia to the battlefields of Granada and the intrigue laden gardens of Seville The ueen’s Vow sweeps us into the tumultuous forging of a nation and the complex fascinating heart of the woman who overcame all odds to become Isabella of Castile. I could not put this book down As he did with Juana of Castile in The Last ueen Gortner has once again taken a historical ueen and made her as interesting and exciting as any modern day heroine It s interesting to me how little I knew of Isabella of Spain one who was so instrumental in allowing Columbus to open the way for the future settlement of what would become America Of course that is what we were taught when I was in elementary school so many years ago The implications of what came after Columbus s discovery is entirely another story And yes this is a fictional depiction of a historical figure but there is no denying the historical accuracy here Gortner does his research wellIsabella rose to power in a tumultuous time in Spain To say that she was a steadfast and determined woman is saying little The conventions of the time did not allow a princess to choose their own husband and yet she did Spurred by her own will and her strong Catholic faith Isabella was a force to be reckoned with Her marriage to a prince of Aragon was a love match yes but also a strategic move for the uniting of Spain Together they brought about the change of many conventions in SpainHowever her reign was not without its blemishes The Inuisition and the expulsion of the Jews are two events that have brought much negativity to history s portrayal of Isabella However Gortner has succeeded in depicting a possible reason for her decisions by giving us a multifaceted woman who believed in compassion and yet was driven by a faith that had no tolerance for other religions To truly judge a person s actions we would need to know about the real person and yet we must rely on the history books Gortner has done a good job of giving us a very human woman who truly felt her actions were for the good of her kingdomI have now been inspired to read about the history of Spain and its ruling class Once again historical fiction has done its very important job that of leading us to further learning about history Something only a well written book can do This is that bookNote There is an excellent author s note at the end of the book with further resources for reading about Isabella and her times Also a special note about a cause dear to my heart The plight of Spanish greyhounds Be sure to check it out

READ & DOWNLOAD ¹ TOBERMOREDRIVEWAYS.CO.UK Ý C.W. Gortner

The ueen's Vow

No one believed I was destined for greatness So begins Isabella’s story in this evocative vividly imagined novel about one of history’s most famous and controversial ueens the warrior who united a fractured country the champion of the faith whose reign gave rise to the Inuisition and the visionary who sent Columbus to discover a New World Acclaimed author The ueen's PDF or C W Gortner envisages the turbulent early years of a woman whose mythic rise to power would go on to transform a monarchy a nation and the world Young Isabella is barely a teenager when she and her brother are taken from their mother’s home to live under the watchful eye of thei. Spain is difficult for historical fiction readers Say Spain and thoughts trigger of bullfights bloodshed torture and religious fanaticism Spanish figures in many HF novels are usually saints heroic devout Katherine of Aragon or villains the evil Armada bearing down on poor beleaguered Elizabeth I And true much of Spain s history IS dark blood drenched and overhung by religion But CW Gortner does something remarkable in The ueen s Vow he takes this country and its complicated history and makes it real Better than that he makes it ours and through the eyes of a ueen who is herself the possessor of a checkered reputation Isabella of Castile who funded Christopher Columbus expelled the Jews from Spain and brought the Spanish Inuisition down on her people But she is much than that and Gortner gently humanizes this daunting figure without glossing over some of her less appealing but accurate for her time faults such as her distaste for homosexuals and her conviction that non Christians are hell bound He introduces us instead to Isabella the young girl negotiating the snakepit politics of her brother s court with a touching grace Her religiousity is not mere fanaticism but her only comfort in a very dangerous world that wants to sully and kill her Her bravery in seeking out a mate who will accept her as fellow ueen and partner leads her to brash warrior Fernando of Aragon their romance is passionate but realistic since this couple has its problems over the years and Fernando has considerable struggles acknowledging his wife as true eual Together they achieve some truly splendid things victory over the intruding Moors the beginnings of universities and education for women and above all the uniting of a fractured series of warring kingdoms into a world power known as Spain Isabella might be short sighted when she prays earnestly over whether history will condemn her for expelling the Jews you want to reach through the page and yell in her ear but she is also a hard working visionary who carries her country on her back and never complains about the cost of that burden She understands her country and she loves it and through her eyes you will too An insightful book about a fascinating woman and an eye opening insider view of an often maligned country

C.W. Gortner Ý 1 FREE READ

R half brother King Enriue and his sultry conniving ueen There Isabella is thrust into danger when she becomes an unwitting pawn in a plot to dethrone Enriue Suspected of treason and held captive she treads a perilous path torn between loyalties until at age seventeen she suddenly finds herself heiress of Castile the largest kingdom in Spain Plunged into a deadly conflict to secure her crown she is determined to wed the one man she loves yet who is forbidden to her Fernando prince of Aragon As they unite their two realms under “one crown one country one faith” Isabella and Fernando face an impoverished Spain beset by enemies With the future of her t. Where I got the book ARC from the LibraryThing Early Reviewer programThis is a worthy novel by a popular writer and yet somehow it leaves me flat I suspect I m not the right reader for this book for one thing I am rather tired of histfic about the crowned heads of Europe even if primed by The Tudors and Wolf Hall I was receptive to learning some about the mother of Catherine of Aragon Henry VIII s first of many I d much rather read about an ordinary guy or gal for a changeFirst what was good Gortner s prose is polished he kept the huge cast of characters straight in my mind without throwing in obvious identifiers as a less skilled writer would I felt I learned something about 15th century Spain and it was clear that the subject had been well researched The story spanned several years without jarring jumps forward or backward and I have no uibbles with the writing or the editing in generalSo why aren t I excited I would say reason 1 is that I simply never grew to like any of the characters even Isabella for whom Gortner obviously has a great deal of sympathy There was a tiny moment when Isabella and Fernando first met that I liked them both but it didn t last I felt flat as if I knew who were the goodies and who were the baddies because Gortner told me so but I never really felt either their goodness or their badness And nobody really seemed to grow All those years and they seemed the same at the end of the novel as at the beginning with a few lines sags and gray hairs in their descriptions Perhaps this was due to Isabella s voice which was fluid and unvarying so very rational and blameless and ironed out Very like Philippa Gregory with the uirks of writing and the magical bits removed and guess what I found I missed the very things that irritate me about PG It strikes me that all these novels about royal women suffer from the same problem which is that said women were very often far from where the action was taking place Isabella was constantly waiting for Fernando to return from war writing letters and doing administrative stuff it s true but all the REALLY interesting events were happening offstage while Isabella popped out babies and worried about money Perhaps it s time we started writing about the royal men rather than the women but I think there s a prevailing fear that women readers most histfic readers I suspect won t identify with a male protagonist I thought the ending was a little odd too The story just seems to grind to a halt with an attempt at reconciling past and present view spoilerthrough Christopher Columbus who pops up in a rather deus ex machina way although historically accurate I m sure given the date we d reached to remind Isabella that nobody had thought she d do anything much with her life either hide spoiler


10 thoughts on “The ueen's Vow

  1. says:

    Spain is difficult for historical fiction readers Say Spain and thoughts trigger of bullfights bloodshed torture and religious fanaticism Spanish figures in many HF novels are usually saints heroic devout Katherine of Aragon or villains the evil Armada bearing down on poor beleaguered Elizabeth I And true much of Spain's history IS dark blood drenched and overhung by religion But CW Gortner does something remarkable in T

  2. says:

    This was an engrossing and educational read about the reign of Isabella I of Castile a bodacious female monarch who made her indelible mark on Spanish history The timeline of the story stretched from 1464 when she was 13 and an infante 2nd i

  3. says:

    I've not been looking forward to rating this one I am a big fan of Gortner I have pre ordered his last 3 books and The Last

  4. says:

    Where I got the book ARC from the LibraryThing Early Reviewer programThis is a worthy novel by a popular writer and yet somehow it leaves me flat I suspect I'm not the right reader for this book; for one thing I am rather tired of histfic about the crowned heads of Europe even if primed by The Tudors and Wolf Hal

  5. says:

    Another magnificent release by CW Gortner He excels at bringing the indomitable ueen Isabella of Castile to life in this gripping and unputdownable novel Highly recommended

  6. says:

    Read This Review More Like It On My Blog45 out of 5 The ueen's Vow is a great first introduction to a well known and well recommended historical fiction author I've heard and seen CW Gortner's name bandied about freuently as one of the best for compelling researched and still original novels and every claim is only reinforced by my reading experience with this novel about Castile's complicated and dramatic ueen Without c

  7. says:

    After my semi rant about there not being enough fiction about Isabella I was ecstatic when I saw this book A story from a notable historical f

  8. says:

    Find this and other reviews at consider myself a historic fiction reader It is my primary stomping ground and the genre I fe

  9. says:

    I could not put this book down As he did with Juana of Castile in The Last ueen Gortner has once again taken a historical ueen and made her as interesting and exciting as any modern day heroine It's interesting to me how little I knew of Isabella of Spain; one who was so instrumental in allowing Columbus to open the way for the future settlement of what would become America Of course that is what we were taught when I was in el

  10. says:

    This book should be subtitled Isabella Tells You All About Her Reign because that is what Gortner does TELLS you what happened The narrative is full of passive description we did this we did that the reason for this was the reason for that was I could skip paragraphs and never really miss anything The first rule a fiction writer learns is show don't tell When Gortner did show action as in the early part of the novel dealing with Isabella's