review Telling Stories 103



10 thoughts on “Telling Stories

  1. says:

    I read very few biographies In fact I read very little non fiction full stop But this book I felt compelled to read having been a committed Charlatans fan since the early 90s They still remain one of my favourite bands to see liveThe book itself was an easy read the title very apt as it was just like listening to Tim Burgess tell stories I docked a star as I thought the last few chapters were a bit rushed and it did jump around somewhat But overall was uite eye opening regarding how deep Tim fell into the drug fuelled life style I was blissfully unaware of this all the times I saw him on stage Oh so glad he pulled himself back from the brink Here's to many years of great albums and Brixton Academy gigs


  2. says:

    Tim Burgess is clearly bonkers These loose limbed ramblings about his shambolic rocking and rolling are as close to full on stream of consciousness hokum as anything Joyce or Ms Woolf published Plus neither Ulysses nor To The Lighthouse include a page long digression on the logistics of rectal ingestion of class A drugs So that's nice It may be hard to follow at times with scant regard for chronology but it feels authentic Despite the addiction the deaths the break ups and the broken friendships it's all fairly light and jolly Fun


  3. says:

    Absolutely adored this book Tim's uick sense of humor and love for music shines through in his writing It was especially interesting to hear him talk so much about where his musical influences came from one of the biggest being one of my favorite artists New Order His enthusiasm over his musical influences as well as for the records he collects is contagious and left me wanting to immediately go and put on some records and dance Also his honesty when it comes to the darker periods of his life from his heavy drug use to the death of The Charlatans band member and friend Rob Collins is refreshing and emotional All of these elements kept me completely glued to the book over the past couple of days Telling Stories is a uniue and beautiful book and is especially a must read for any fan of 80s and 90s alternative music


  4. says:

    A step above the average rock star autobiography Telling Stories manages to sidestep the usual linear chronology of gigs played girls shagged and drugs taken Of course that sort of stuff is in there but it is mixed in with interesting tangents which give insight into the mind and personality of Tim Burgess Most pleasingly what really came across was Tim’s genuine enthusiasm for music and his range of musical tastes something surprisingly lacking in some other music autobiographies Whilst I am not a mega fan of The Charlatans I like a good rock autobiography and I found Tim Burgess to be affable interesting and over the course of 233 pages good company


  5. says:

    Tim Burgess lead singer and frontman with The Charlatans has lead a life immersed in music I was particularly interested to read Telling Stories because The Charlatans were a band I listened to a lot during my teens I grew up in Monmouth in a midterraced house on Rockfield Road just a couple of miles from where The Charlatans recorded I actually met Tim Burgess twice in the mid 90s and was completely in awe of this beautiful man He had an ethereal uality seeming much introvert than his outer persona would suggest I still have his autograph on the back of a National Lottery slip Burgess talks about his teenage years clubbing in Manchester particularly at the legendary Hacienda and his early experiences of substance abuse As a vinyl collector he is knowledgeable about an eclectic mix of artists and bands name checking and recommending them throughout the book You'll be reaching for your music collection or youtube for some of the obscure recommendations as you read Then of course there are his experiences as a musician The Charlatans are often referred to as part of the 'Madchester' scene and also the later IndieBritpop genre However part of the beauty of The Charlatans is their constantly evolving sound and when you read Telling Stories and see the diverse list of influences it becomes apparent just why their sound transcends so many genresMost music memoirs are chock full of sex drugs and rock and roll Burgess himself acknowledges that drugs and rock and roll were his focus openly admitting to the methods he used to smuggle drugs across borders and his drug reliance which he refers to as self medication The tragic death of bandmate Rob Collins fraud scandal and armed robbery add depth and emotion to this compelling autobiography An honest insightful look into the mind of a notable musician Telling Stories is an interesting memoir which will particularly appeal to music fans of a certain age


  6. says:

    With the help of four nicely spaced coffee and cigarette breaks finished the whole book in 7 hours Feel like I’ve been on a amazing trip


  7. says:

    First of all; Tim Burgess is no writer Don't open this book expecting to be blown away by the uality of the prose Don't get me wrong; it's a fantastic read but only because of the subject matter Telling Stories starts off a bit disjointed There's something willy nilly in the narrator's style and approach that sets you off groaning inside and thinking This book is going to be a trial to read You start thinking that Telling Stories is under edited under structured that it needs another couple of re writes But fear not After a couple of dozen pages Tim finds his feet you get used to his voice and the book becomes a page turner In fact the voice becomes so strong that it's like having Tim sitting there beside you spinning tall tales from the Madchester scene Britpop and his 'fat Elvis' years in LA And it's a vibrant engaging funny likable voiceTim is honest to a fault considered in his reminiscences and one gets the distinct impression that he's being as kind as he can to those around him in the impressions you're left with of such figures as Alan McGee Tim comes across as gifted mystical romantic passionate about his music but than anything else gentle kind and true He's the cheeky but big hearted leader of the pack who's a bit too wild for his own good admired and looked up to by the boys and desired by the ladies There's no effort in the book to settle old scores or put himself at the epicenter of everything Telling Stories is straight up credible and appreciably exaggeration freeI'd recommend this book to anyone with an interest in rock music not just fans of The Charlatans or baggy All sorts of fascinating figures turn up in the most unusual of situations The anecdotes fly fast and thick And yes the famous cocaine straw bum story is included Tim's knowledge of music is encyclopaedic and his musical journey from punk to baggy to the LA of the mid noughties with all its off shoots characters swings and roundabouts is a pleasure for any fan of music to be brought on He seems to have connected with everyone from Elliot Smith to Paul Weller The process of song writing the nuts and bolts of recording and touring are all explored from Tim's uniue vantage point What emerges is the story of one man's finding of himself after years of over indulgence good and infamously bad luck acclaim ridicule and all the rest that rock 'n' roll brings with it


  8. says:

    Tim Burgess the lead singer and songwriter of the great MadchesterBaggy survivors The Charlatans has written a disappointing memoir Fair enough Burgess himself admits that he has written the book like a chat in the pub but I would have still liked to have gotten a bit information about how the Madchester Baggy scene looked like from an insiders point of view Was is just a happy accident or was there something a bit planned behind itAnother interesting thing would have been to learn about a how the download revolution really affected bands like the Charlatans or artists like Burgess Burgess touches upon the subject when he briefly mentions that the Charlatans was the first major band to allow it’s new album to be downloaded completely free but should have spend much time explaining the reasons for it and it's implications for their subseuent career Was it a wise move or not?Unfortunately Burgess’ urge to tell about his drug and alcohol use seems to have been the main motivation behind these memoirs But you need to be a real addictheavy user to write an interesting book about drugs subject to surviving to tell the tale of course William Burroughs Thomas De uincey Aleister Crowley Ageyev and Jim Carroll are writers that have managed to do that Recreational use that goes on occasional overdrive is not interesting read to outsiders at all and Burgess’ book proves that At the end of the day Burgess is just too nice and decent a fellow to have plunged into real drug abuse and debauchery Burgess is no Sebastian Horsley and for him that is a really good thing but it makes a boring and sometimes embarrassing readBurgess’ story would have made a really good and amusing long feature in Mojo or Uncut but as a 250 page book it is not worth reading


  9. says:

    A totally frank and often unnerving dissection of the life and times of one Timothy Burgess frontman to the unluckiest band in the world The Charlatans who by Burgess' own admission have experienced in their remarkable career as many highs as they have lows The book which is a reasonably slim volume given the timeframe it covers is as much an insightful and frank account of what it's like to front a band and have iconically coiffured hair as it is about the records loves cities and people that inspire such an endeavourBurgess' voice is warm cheeky and full of spirit even when dealing with the controversial aspects of the bands existence such as the incarceration and subseuent death in a tragic car accident of one of the key band members earlier in their career However it is never anything less than engaging and often amusingly self deprecating; the cringe worthy and often humorous recollection of an interview transcribed in full in the book whilst intoxicated at the hands of a bemused laconic journalist being an incredible low high? point His later reformation as a proponent of transcendental meditation is all the surprising as a result All in all then a knowing and enjoyable rock and roll autobiography that is suitably redemptive and that doesn't outstay it's welcome


  10. says:

    This is far from a conventional autobiography and there seems a lot of criticism from some other reviewers around thisTo them I would gently suggest that the clue is in the titleThere is no strict chronology to this instead Tim regales you with various tales of his journey so farHe pulls no punches and is not afraid to nail his colours to the mast He doesn't gloss over his battles with drugs and is refreshingly candid without glamourising the matterThe book has a conversational tone and I was left with the feeling that we're I to bump into Tim in a bar or a pop up Tim Peaks coffee shop I would feel the urge to carry on a tale in the way an old friend wouldTo me that's lavish praise for how the book engaged with me Clearly for others it's not the way a memoir should be but that feels a little puritanical to me


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read & download ☆ eBook or Kindle ePUB Ü Tim Burgess

The drugsPacked with incredible stories this frank and vivid memoir describes the mad life of a rock star the dynamics of the band the creativity and the self destruction the sex and the drugs but also the rock 'n roll his obsession with music shines off the page as he writes about his influences and his encounters from Dylan to New Order from Paul Weller to Oasi Tim Burgess the lead singer and songwriter of the great MadchesterBaggy survivors The Charlatans has written a disappointing memoir Fair enough Burgess himself admits that he has written the book like a chat in the pub but I would have still liked to have gotten a bit information about how the Madchester Baggy scene looked like from an insiders point of view Was is just a happy accident or was there something a bit planned behind itAnother interesting thing would have been to learn about a how the download revolution really affected bands like the Charlatans or artists like Burgess Burgess touches upon the subject when he briefly mentions that the Charlatans was the first major band to allow it’s new album to be downloaded completely free but should have spend much time explaining the reasons for it and it's implications for their subseuent career Was it a wise move or not?Unfortunately Burgess’ urge to tell about his drug and alcohol use seems to have been the main motivation behind these memoirs But you need to be a real addictheavy user to write an interesting book about drugs subject to surviving to tell the tale of course William Burroughs Thomas De uincey Aleister Crowley Ageyev and Jim Carroll are writers that have managed to do that Recreational use that goes on occasional overdrive is not interesting read to outsiders at all and Burgess’ book proves that At the end of the day Burgess is just too nice and decent a fellow to have plunged into real drug abuse and debauchery Burgess is no Sebastian Horsley and for him that is a really good thing but it makes a boring and sometimes embarrassing readBurgess’ story would have made a really good and amusing long feature in Mojo or Uncut but as a 250 page book it is not worth reading Dr. Grass rock star the dynamics of the band the creativity and the self destruction the sex and the drugs but also the Deadly Fallout (Red Stone Security, rock 'n God's Hammer roll his obsession with music shines off the page as he writes about his influences and his encounters from Dylan to New Order from Paul Weller to Oasi Tim Burgess the lead singer and songwriter of the great MadchesterBaggy survivors The Charlatans has written a disappointing memoir Fair enough Burgess himself admits that he has written the book like a chat in the pub but I would have still liked to have gotten a bit information about how the Madchester Baggy scene looked like from an insiders point of view Was is just a happy accident or was there something a bit planned behind itAnother interesting thing would have been to learn about a how the download Akshyay Mulberry Vol.One revolution Six-Moon Trail really affected bands like the Charlatans or artists like Burgess Burgess touches upon the subject when he briefly mentions that the Charlatans was the first major band to allow it’s new album to be downloaded completely free but should have spend much time explaining the Como Abrir Mentes Fechadas reasons for it and it's implications for their subseuent career Was it a wise move or not?Unfortunately Burgess’ urge to tell about his drug and alcohol use seems to have been the main motivation behind these memoirs But you need to be a The Harlem Hellfighters real addictheavy user to write an interesting book about drugs subject to surviving to tell the tale of course William Burroughs Thomas De uincey Aleister Crowley Ageyev and Jim Carroll are writers that have managed to do that Recreational use that goes on occasional overdrive is not interesting Longman Introductory Course for the TOEFL Test read to outsiders at all and Burgess’ book proves that At the end of the day Burgess is just too nice and decent a fellow to have plunged into Mustard Seed Magic real drug abuse and debauchery Burgess is no Sebastian Horsley and for him that is a Sekrety ewolucji, kochania i swawolenia really good thing but it makes a boring and sometimes embarrassing Devils Gate readBurgess’ story would have made a Die ewigen Toten (David Hunter, Band 6) really good and amusing long feature in Mojo or Uncut but as a 250 page book it is not worth Jane Goodalls Animal World reading

characters Telling Stories

Telling Stories

Tim Burgess grew up in rural Cheshire but from his mid teens he spent as much time as he could at the legendary Hacienda in Manchester He was invited to be the vocalist in newly formed The Charlatans who went from supporting The Stone Roses to having three UK number one albums and seventeen Top Thirty singles They rode the waves of first Madchester then Britpop Th Absolutely adored this book Tim's uick sense of humor and love for music shines through in his writing It was especially interesting to hear him talk so much about where his musical influences came from one of the biggest being one of my favorite artists New Order His enthusiasm over his musical influences as well as for the records he collects is contagious and left me wanting to immediately go and put on some records and dance Also his honesty when it comes to the darker periods of his life from his heavy drug use to the death of The Charlatans band member and friend Rob Collins is refreshing and emotional All of these elements kept me completely glued to the book over the past couple of days Telling Stories is a uniue and beautiful book and is especially a must read for any fan of 80s and 90s alternative music Zombie CSU rural Cheshire but from his mid teens he spent as much time as he could at the legendary Hacienda in Manchester He was invited to be the vocalist in newly formed The Charlatans who went from supporting The Stone Roses to having three UK number one albums and seventeen Top Thirty singles They Conquerors rode the waves of first Madchester then Britpop Th Absolutely adored this book Tim's uick sense of humor and love for music shines through in his writing It was especially interesting to hear him talk so much about where his musical influences came from one of the biggest being one of my favorite artists New Order His enthusiasm over his musical influences as well as for the The Legacy Chronicles: Chasing Ghosts records he collects is contagious and left me wanting to immediately go and put on some Deathcaster (Shattered Realms, records and dance Also his honesty when it comes to the darker periods of his life from his heavy drug use to the death of The Charlatans band member and friend Rob Collins is A Peoples Tragedy refreshing and emotional All of these elements kept me completely glued to the book over the past couple of days Telling Stories is a uniue and beautiful book and is especially a must Out of the Ashes (The Legacy Chronicles, read for any fan of 80s and 90s alternative music

read & download ☆ eBook or Kindle ePUB Ü Tim Burgess

E band survived the imprisonment of influential keyboardist Rob Collins on a charge of armed robbery then the death of Collins in a car accident; their accountant running off with all their money and leaving them with a tax bill of almost £2 million; and in recent years the rock 'n' roll life style of Burgess himself as he took himself off to LA for the music and With the help of four nicely spaced coffee and cigarette breaks finished the whole book in 7 hours Feel like I’ve been on a amazing trip