Characters ¹ Respectable Ç PDF, DOC, TXT, eBook or Kindle ePUB free



10 thoughts on “Respectable

  1. says:

    I was predisposed to regard Lynsey Hanley’s book favourably having very much enjoyed her previous work Estates and finding that we had a similar background albeit separated by a decade or so While Hanley was raised on the Chelmsley Wood council estate in Solihull I was fortunate enough to grow up in the slightly salubrious Shirley my parents were both born into poverty but benefited from postwar employment levels so that by the time I wa

  2. says:

    While reading ‘Respectable’ I couldn’t help contemplating how I would write my own version as I’ve sometimes considered doing Like Hanley I spend uite a lot of time thinking about the British class system a

  3. says:

    BOTWhttpwwwbbccoukprogrammesb0785nl9Description Journalist Lynsey Hanley's personal exploration of the experience of class in Britain over the past four decadesChanging class is like emigrating from one side of the world

  4. says:

    Very readable and therefore I got through it faster than I expected but also I found a lot in common in terms of life experiences background and trajectory so it was gripping and deeply thought provoking I've always had the sense of running away from my upbringing to a better life of my own making and in recent years been aware of the rift that creates with the past and the people in it This book makes expli

  5. says:

    From BBC radio 4 Book of the WeekJournalist Lynsey Hanley's personal exploration of the experience of class in Britain over the past four decades25 I can draw an outline of the landscape that shaped us with words such as Nice biscuit

  6. says:

    The premise of this book is a very interesting one and it's very definitely a book that makes you think I'm not sure whether it's about class or social mobility I think that both of those topics are big enough for a book of their own I'm very glad to have read this it was useful and helpful Having grown up as an expat I'm sort of half in half

  7. says:

    A very readable combination of the author's autobiographical reminiscences of growing up as 'respectable' working class on a Birmingham council estate with academic analysis of class divisions in British societyIt

  8. says:

    BBC Radio 4 Book of the Book interesting historical and locality reminiscences well written

  9. says:

    SuperbA moving touching and funny account of social mobility Hugely thought provoking; a great read I could not put it down

  10. says:

    “Our culture contains many silent symbols powerful than money It contains keys that can’t be bought which gain access to rooms whose existence you can barely imagine unless you get to enter them Social and cultural capital works on a compound interest model the you have the you get The knowledge and influence you accrue the you get to know other people with knowledge and influence and the knowledge and influence you acuire t

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Characters ï PDF, DOC, TXT, eBook or Kindle ePUB free ´ Lynsey Hanley

To pay to leave behind her working class world and become middle classClass remains resolutely with us as strongly as it did fifty years ago and with it the idea of aspiration of social mobility which received wisdom tells us is an uneuivocally positive phenomenon for individuals and for society as a whole Yet for the many millions who experience it changing class is like emigrating from one side of t. Very readable and therefore I got through it faster than I expected but also I found a lot in common in terms of life experiences background and trajectory so it was gripping and deeply thought provoking I ve always had the sense of running away from my upbringing to a better life of my own making and in recent years been aware of the rift that creates with the past and the people in it This book makes explicit the emotional divide inherent in those choices It also exposes the structural ineualities that mean those who do make it are the exceptions in terms of social mobility not the proof of success the Thatcher and Blair governments wanted us to believe The ability to live a full life that is to fulfil personal potential is still impossible for large sections of society for entirely unjustifiable reasons I say that having a strong sense of drive and determination and so the individualistic way to look at this would be that if you have enough will hard work whatever you can still succeed but the fact is the majority of working class kids and people have to struggle against far harder odds than those already born into middle class privilege and I don t just mean money although clearly that s very important It s the backwards in high heels problem deriving from the analogy about Fred Ginger she did everything he did but backwards and in high heels showing that often for underprivileged groups often women but it applies to class too to reach the same goals you have to struggle through additional multiple disadvantages Mainly it made me angry

Free read Respectable

Respectable

He world to another a lonely anxious psychologically disruptive process of uprooting which leaves people divided between the place they left and the place they have to inhabit in order to get on In this empathic wry and passionate exploration of class in Britain today Lynsey Hanley looks at how people are kept apart and keep themselves apart and the costs involved in the journey from 'there' to 'here'.. A very readable combination of the author s autobiographical reminiscences of growing up as respectable working class on a Birmingham council estate with academic analysis of class divisions in British societyIt s a pity it was published too early to include any analysis of the Brexit vote

Characters ï PDF, DOC, TXT, eBook or Kindle ePUB free ´ Lynsey Hanley

Society is often talked about as a ladder from which you can climb from bottom to top The walls are less talked about This book is about how people try to get over them whether they manage to or notIn autumn growing up on a vast Birmingham estate the sixteen year old Lynsey Hanley went to sixth form college She knew that it would change her life but was entirely unprepared for the price she would have. While reading Respectable I couldn t help contemplating how I would write my own version as I ve sometimes considered doing Like Hanley I spend uite a lot of time thinking about the British class system and its influence on my childhood and education My background is markedly different to Hanley s but I have a similar sense of having experienced life in multiple parts of the class hierarchy while feeling slightly set apart from them Unsurprisingly I found her insights fascinating She writes in a thoughtful careful style that draws out subtle points about class that I hadn t considered before She is wary of simplistic solutions to entrenched ineualities and delicate in her analysis of politics Perhaps the only flaw in the book is that it felt uite short I wanted to hear from her Particularly acute insights includedThe interesting thing about entering the middle class is that everything you have known is turned on its head You go from being invisible to society and yet at the same time the object of constant scrutiny and mistrust to being at once anonymous and in possession of a voice You are trusted to get on with things and encouraged to go on endlessly about the way in which you do themThat s as neat a description of how privilege plays out in 21st century Britain as I ve ever come across I also liked this concise explanation of class differences in speechAnother uality that Bernstein identified in working class speech is its fragmentary nature By sticking with the description of individual events rather than unifying them into a larger narrative you accept that contingency of things after all your circumstances may have changed by tomorrow and in any case what you ve said is likely to have significance only in the specific context in which you said it Middle class speech by comparison smacks of grandeur because it seeks to place feelings and events in a universal context with the inference that the individual speaker and his perceptions matter in the greater scheme of things In my experience at the top of middle class and above speech becomes either very self deprecating with tacit subtext of superiority or even grandiose Often both varying by context and topicHanley devotes uite a bit of the book to the school system and how it reproduces the class system She considers the implications of various educational reforms of the 20th and 21st centuries as well as the decrepit comprehensive school she attended until sixth form This reminded me of a piece of serendipity that has profoundly shaped my life in 1996 I got an assisted place that allowed me to attend a former grammar now private single sex high school A year later Labour won the election and abolished assisted places There is no way I could have attended a fee paying school without what was effectively a means tested scholarship At my local high school I wouldn t have been able to study German Latin or economics my exam results would have been worse I very much doubt I could have got into Cambridge A lot seems to hang on being lucky enough to be born at the right time Of course plenty of other Labour policies reduced educational ineualities and I feel ambivalent about assisted places despite benefiting hugely from one I benefited because I already had the middle class speech patterns and enthusiasm for learning without my family having financial resources to shop around for high schools Intangible social capital exerts considerable influence from childhood into work life As Hanley puts itUpward social mobility is common than downward because it is generationally harder to lose middle class privileges once you have them than it is to gain them A family may rapidly lose money through repossession or bankruptcy for instance but its members can t lose knowledge already gained ualifications already earned expectations already entrenched half as uickly This is something which members of the middle class tend to overlook or underestimate and which causes them to work harder than they probably need in order to retain those privileges I d add networks to this losing money needn t mean the loss of social contacts who can provide invaluable signposts to jobs housing etc And on the subject of working harder than they need to I think visibly working hard for excessive hours has become a matter of pride and signifier of privilege in middle class Britain It demonstrates aspiration suggests that you find your work worthwhile and interesting and in a weird way has become associated with independence via ostentatious self discipline Under late capitalism you can exploit yourself for the benefit of international capital Perhaps this fetishisation of hard work also reflects a very neoliberal perception that the richest people those at the top of the hierarchy that we should be looking up to work the hardest of all Which is garbage once you have a large enough pile of wealth you can do nothing whatsoever and let the magic of compound interest take care of you and your descendants I think anything I write about class is likely to be angrier than Hanley s book as I seem to have ungrateful resentment about the system s hypocrisies than she does Most likely this is thanks to Cambridge which inculcates a willingness to criticise and sense of entitlement to be heard like nowhere else except Oxford Since the British class system really needs ualitative analysis I d love to read memoirs of this kind Please recommend me any that you know of For a uantitative analysis of Britain s class system I suggest Mike Savage s Social Class in the 21st Century