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Benjamin Gilmour ✓ 0 Read

‘As you read this than a hundred thousand ambulance medics across the planet are responding to emergencies They are scrambling under crashed cars carrying the sick down flights of stairs resuscitating near dead husbands at the feet of hysterical wives and stemming the blood flow of gunshot victims in seedy back alleys A good number too are just as It's funny how clueless we can be when it comes to the way other countries do things that we in the first world take for granted I thought all ambulance services were basically the same with only tiny differences between adoption of new drugs or new techniues perhaps a doctor on this one but not on that one But I guarantee I will never see ambulances used to transport live goats and butchered meat to the poor in Australia like they do in Pakistan home to the world's largest private ambulance serviceTime and time again my eyes were opened reading Paramedico From South Africa where anything but a five minute scene time is a fail no matter what the injury and closely monitored by stony faced supervisors with stopwatches; to Macedonia where an elderly dehydrated and weak patient can be left at home on a drip with instructions on how to remove his own cannula; to Mexico where an elderly patient can break every bone in her body after being hit by a high speed car but gets no pain relief but does get a ride to hospital filled with delays and jarring bumpsAmbulance 'drivers' in London who spend their work days transporting wealthy people to doctor's appointments Venetian paramedics who can't give CPR because it just doesn't work on a little boat A Pakistani ED that miraculously clears in only a few hours after nineteen dead and fifty injured in a gruesome suicide bomb attackAnd the different work ethics Honestly they're like something from a grim dark comedy drinking strong spirits on the job strapping a colleague to a stretcher and dousing her in cold water for her birthday jumping on each other in a huge pile or selling gory photos to journalists; at the same time as some working 48 hour shifts or dealing with ten or twenty gunshot murders in a shift That's TEN or TWENTY Gunshot murders Per shiftEuipment is hard to come by in many countries some crews have to carefully ration their disposable latex gloves many don't have drugs not even the drugs that revert a cardiac arrestBut perhaps my favourite eye opener was how various control centres around the world treat their patients In Macedonia call takers abuse callers for 'not being sick or injured enough' and slam the phones down In Pakistan numbers are barred after a hoax call A world away from the 'every caller wins an ambulance' of AustraliaIf you like having your eyes opened if you like learning about how tough others have it without actually having to experience it then this is a must read The only bad thing I have to say is that the section on Pakistan went on for too long but there was an awful lot to tell there so I get how that can happen Two Hours this Finding Us (Finding, than a hundred The End of the Story thousand ambulance medics across ديوان حافظ the planet are responding The Christmas Killer to emergencies They are scrambling under crashed cars carrying The Fall of the House of Usher/The Pit & the Pendulum/Other Tales of Mystery & Imagination the sick down flights of stairs resuscitating near dead husbands at The Lost Revolution the feet of hysterical wives and stemming Marion Mahony Reconsidered the blood flow of gunshot victims in seedy back alleys A good number The Girl in the Glass Tower too are just as It's funny how clueless we can be when it comes The Great Divide to The Lady and the Peacock the way other countries do Flights of Fancy, Leaps of Faith things The Real Deal that we in The Holy Roman Empire 1495-1806 the first world Complete Enderby take for granted I The Invisible Writing thought all ambulance services were basically The Penguin Book of Dutch Short Stories the same with only The Winter of the Lions tiny differences between adoption of new drugs or new The Malay Archipelago, the land of the orang-utan and the bird of paradise; a narrative of travel, with studies of man and nature - Volume 2 techniues perhaps a doctor on The Not So Invisible Woman this one but not on A Short History of Egypt that one But I guarantee I will never see ambulances used The Boss to Captain Greys Lady transport live goats and butchered meat The Handmaidens to My Bossy Dolly the poor in Australia like Maternal Justice they do in Pakistan home The Ascent of Rum Doodle to A Bachelors Baby the world's largest private ambulance serviceTime and The Carpenters Daughter time again my eyes were opened reading Paramedico From South Africa where anything but a five minute scene A Talent for Surrender time is a fail no matter what Orchard Street, Dawn the injury and closely monitored by stony faced supervisors with stopwatches; Stepbrother Dearest to Macedonia where an elderly dehydrated and weak patient can be left at home on a drip with instructions on how Mystery in Spiderville to remove his own cannula; Spring to Mexico where an elderly patient can break every bone in her body after being hit by a high speed car but gets no pain relief but does get a ride Unknown (Anders Knutas, to hospital filled with delays and jarring bumpsAmbulance 'drivers' in London who spend A time for being human their work days Stanley and the Women transporting wealthy people The Gene to doctor's appointments Venetian paramedics who can't give CPR because it just doesn't work on a little boat A Pakistani ED The Empty Hand (The Snow Walker, that miraculously clears in only a few hours after nineteen dead and fifty injured in a gruesome suicide bomb attackAnd Seasons of Splendour the different work ethics Honestly Stage Mum they're like something from a grim dark comedy drinking strong spirits on A Village Affair / A Passionate Man / The Rectors Wife the job strapping a colleague The Relate Guide to Sex in Loving Relationships to a stretcher and dousing her in cold water for her birthday jumping on each other in a huge pile or selling gory photos Salvage to journalists; at Thin Air (Jessica Shaw, the same Blue Book of Grown-Up Fairytales time as some working 48 hour shifts or dealing with Mo Hayder 2-Book Bundle ten or Broken Horse (Saddle Club, twenty gunshot murders in a shift That's TEN or TWENTY Gunshot murders Per shiftEuipment is hard Sarah Keys Back Sufferers Bible to come by in many countries some crews have Will in the World to carefully ration Traitors Purse (Albert Campion Mystery their disposable latex gloves many don't have drugs not even How Baking Works the drugs The Birthday Party that revert a cardiac arrestBut perhaps my favourite eye opener was how various control centres around The Summer House the world The Seance treat Crap Crimes their patients In Macedonia call Horse Tale (Saddle Club, takers abuse callers for 'not being sick or injured enough' and slam The Best of Daughters the phones down In Pakistan numbers are barred after a hoax call A world away from Unclaimed Experience the 'every caller wins an ambulance' of AustraliaIf you like having your eyes opened if you like learning about how Wilfred Owen tough others have it without actually having Indurain: La historia definitiva del mejor corredor del Tour de Francia (Córner) to experience it The Inbetweeners Scriptbook then Out of Breath (Breathing, this is a must read The only bad A Profound Secret thing I have Moby-Dick to say is The Double Silence that Enemies of Promise the section on Pakistan went on for Walking Nature Home too long but Behind Bars there was an awful lot Walking For Fitness to Naked. Brucia in fretta, rompi le regole tell Dawn of Fear there so I get how Francesca Caccini at the Medici Court that can happen

Read & Download Ë PDF, DOC, TXT or eBook ✓ Benjamin Gilmour

Paramedico

Likely to be raising an eyebrow at some ridiculous trivial complaint their patient has considered life threatening enough to call them for’ Paramedico is a heart stopping white knuckle ride about a paramedic at work in an ambulance attending emergencies in far flung places such as England Iceland Macedonia Mexico Pakistan The Philippines South Af I had the pleasure of meeting Benjamin Gilmour although briefly at a booth at the EMS World Expo 2013 in Las Vegas I bought his book and he signed it for me Sadly I did not get to attend the viewing of his film Paramedico that was also shown one evening during this conference I will purchase it online soonTold in non linear multiple chapters each showcasing a particular location this book was very interesting in the different ways EMS is established ran and supported or not supported in different parts of the world I had never really taken the time to ponder how every service is so varied including whether or not the people staffing the ambulances are even medically trained or simply ambulance drivers I was also shocked at how cultural differences dictate the wearing or not wearing of safety euipment including gloves; how in some places of the world bodies body parts and salvageable patients are all loaded into the same ambulance and delivered to the hospital; and how some workers consider emergency response as a great responsibility to humanity while others just see it as a job for money The reverence and enthusiasm shown by the ambulance staff in Pakistan in particular was a powerful lesson as was how some cultures call an ambulance for frivolous complaints while others know the value of help in an emergency and only call for serious problemsIf you are in the EMS business this a great book to read Not heavy on the heroics or drama it's an open view of the EMS world from different perspectives All medics I know should read this book if for nothing else than to gain a reverence for the job we do for our fellow man and an appreciation of the proper tools that we have to do our jobs even when we have tool envy of other services

Read Paramedico

Rica and Thailand – at the time of the 2004 tsunami This is also a brilliantly written collection of wild tales of wild people whose lives are so different from our own that it’s hard to believe they really exist Gilmour is able to make us stop and think not only of how to live a life but how precious life is and how important it is to protect i If you think you know what paramedics do read this book The author has worked as a paramedic in varios countries including Mongolia Mexico ItalyVenice and teaches you things about how medical care is viewed from a different perspective


10 thoughts on “Paramedico

  1. says:

    decided to come out of my reviewing hiatus for this onehaving been a paramedic in a busy system for many years i can say that i am usually not a fan of ems related books largely because they either overdo the dramatic aspects to the point it becomes unrealistic or they have to explain so many things to the layperson that someone who already knows the job has a lot to skip through before getting to the good stuffthis book does neither i think the author nailed it i loved reading about ambulance services in different countries as well as the personalities involved as it would seem that the paramedic persona crosses cultural boundarieswhile the pacing was different from one chapter to the next so is the pace of one day to the next when you work in health care while it would seem some reviewers felt there were weaker chapters than others i felt it was just the right mixturei'll wholeheartedly recommend this book to former co workers if anything some of the chapters are good reminders of despite how much we complain in the american prehospital environment we really do have it uite cushy here


  2. says:

    It's funny how clueless we can be when it comes to the way other countries do things that we in the first world take for granted I thought all ambulance services were basically the same with only tiny differences between adoption of new drugs or new techniues perhaps a doctor on this one but not on that one But I guarantee I will never see ambulances used to transport live goats and butchered meat to the poor in Australia like they do in Pakistan home to the world's largest private ambulance serviceTime and time again my eyes were opened reading Paramedico From South Africa where anything but a five minute scene time is a fail no matter what the injury and closely monitored by stony faced supervisors with stopwatches; to Macedonia where an elderly dehydrated and weak patient can be left at home on a drip with instructions on how to remove his own cannula; to Mexico where an elderly patient can break every bone in her body after being hit by a high speed car but gets no pain relief but does get a ride to hospital filled with delays and jarring bumpsAmbulance 'drivers' in London who spend their work days transporting wealthy people to doctor's appointments Venetian paramedics who can't give CPR because it just doesn't work on a little boat A Pakistani ED that miraculously clears in only a few hours after nineteen dead and fifty injured in a gruesome suicide bomb attackAnd the different work ethics Honestly they're like something from a grim dark comedy drinking strong spirits on the job strapping a colleague to a stretcher and dousing her in cold water for her birthday jumping on each other in a huge pile or selling gory photos to journalists; at the same time as some working 48 hour shifts or dealing with ten or twenty gunshot murders in a shift That's TEN or TWENTY Gunshot murders Per shiftEuipment is hard to come by in many countries some crews have to carefully ration their disposable latex gloves many don't have drugs not even the drugs that revert a cardiac arrestBut perhaps my favourite eye opener was how various control centres around the world treat their patients In Macedonia call takers abuse callers for 'not being sick or injured enough' and slam the phones down In Pakistan numbers are barred after a hoax call A world away from the 'every caller wins an ambulance' of AustraliaIf you like having your eyes opened if you like learning about how tough others have it without actually having to experience it then this is a must read The only bad thing I have to say is that the section on Pakistan went on for too long but there was an awful lot to tell there so I get how that can happen


  3. says:

    An interesting and at times affecting read about pre hospital care across continents but it carries the vibe of a Contiki coach tour – by the time Gilmour scraped the surface of a culture or country we were carted off to the next


  4. says:

    I had the pleasure of meeting Benjamin Gilmour although briefly at a booth at the EMS World Expo 2013 in Las Vegas I bought his book and he signed it for me Sadly I did not get to attend the viewing of his film Paramedico that was also shown one evening during this conference I will purchase it online soonTold in non linear multiple chapters each showcasing a particular location this book was very interesting in the different ways EMS is established ran and supported or not supported in different parts of the world I had never really taken the time to ponder how every service is so varied including whether or not the people staffing the ambulances are even medically trained or simply ambulance drivers I was also shocked at how cultural differences dictate the wearing or not wearing of safety euipment including gloves; how in some places of the world bodies body parts and salvageable patients are all loaded into the same ambulance and delivered to the hospital; and how some workers consider emergency response as a great responsibility to humanity while others just see it as a job for money The reverence and enthusiasm shown by the ambulance staff in Pakistan in particular was a powerful lesson as was how some cultures call an ambulance for frivolous complaints while others know the value of help in an emergency and only call for serious problemsIf you are in the EMS business this a great book to read Not heavy on the heroics or drama it's an open view of the EMS world from different perspectives All medics I know should read this book if for nothing else than to gain a reverence for the job we do for our fellow man and an appreciation of the proper tools that we have to do our jobs even when we have tool envy of other services


  5. says:

    I am not going to lie I had really high hopes for this book as it has been touted to me as the best paramedic related novel you'll read and I'm sure for many people that is the case Unfortunately I don't share the same opinionThe writing style isn't exactly flowing and I find that makes it hard to immerse yourself in the situation the author is describing It is interesting enough to be read once but probably never again and I would not recommend it to my friends I am an operational paramedic working in rural Australia and I found the comparison between countries and their respective Ambulance Services interesting if not a little confronting If anything this book will make you grateful that you live in a country with appropriately government funded pre hospital health care if you happen to be lucky enough to do so The documentary that ties to the book but has no actual tangible connections to it is interesting enough but again watch it once and be confronted how it is in other countries and then probably never watch it again


  6. says:

    A must read for anyone in emergency medicineWhat a great well written book about the life and times of ems around the world Everyone in emergency medicine should read this


  7. says:

    So enjoyed reading Benjamin’s adventures a truly ‘Goodread’ 👍🏼👍🏼👍🏼


  8. says:

    When disaster strikes we all assume the emergency services will be there to help But standards and services offered vary from country to country Australian paramedic Benjamin Gilmour has spent 15 years travelling the world and working alongside ambulance teams learning how they cope with dangerous conditions and minimal budgets From his humble beginnings in the Australian outback to negotiating the staff sauna in Iceland via one or two drunken incidents Paramédico is a selection of tales from his travelsAlthough there are a few amusing anecdotes it’s not really a personal memoir but of a look at ambulance services around the world that Benjamin has spent time with There are a couple of moments where he treads a fine line between objective and judgemental but I don’t think this is intentional It’s just that maybe I was expecting of a compassionate tone Overall it’s a fascinating book and incredibly enlightening readingWe take it for granted that we can phone an emergency number and a paramedic will arrive and look after you administering pre hospital care and delivering you safely to doctors The NHS might have its problems but overall it is an amazing service Reading Paramédico really highlights how good we’ve got here in Britain Benjamin didn’t get a chance to work with London’s finest and instead spends time with a private company whose service was unprofessionalThe large section of the book is devoted to his time in Pakistan where he spent time with both a government funded service and that founded by Abdul Sattar Edhi considered a hero to the poor Whilst interesting I did feel this section was a little overlong and unstructured Oddly enough the better stories were in the second half; Iceland Venice Hawaii and Mexico His Icelandic colleagues might not have a lot of action but Benjamin is concerned by the daily 5 o’clock sauna that he would really rather avoid In Venice the ambulances come by water but have to negotiate hide tides gondoliers and impossible to navigate city streets And the struggling service in Mexico might just put you off heading there on holiday


  9. says:

    If you think you know what paramedics do read this book The author has worked as a paramedic in varios countries including Mongolia Mexico ItalyVenice and teaches you things about how medical care is viewed from a different perspective


  10. says:

    Even though I am not in the field of EMS I enjoyed this book It was funny and interesting at the same time Just enough laughs to balance out the truly outrageous conditions that paramedics around the world work in There is also a short film that was great too


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