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review ☆ E-book, or Kindle E-pub Ð Andrew Graham-Dixon

Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio 29 September 1571–18 July 1610 lived probably the darkest and most dangerous life of any of the great painters The worlds of Milan and Rome through which Caravaggio moved and which Andrew Graham Dixon describes brilliantly in this book are th This is a biography of a gifted artist who unfortunately also possessed a proud and difficult personality that got him into freuent trouble with the law Ironically much of what is known about Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio 1571–1610 comes to us from the criminal archives that document his freuent arrests and various depositions in legal interrogations Of course his paintings are also a permanent record of his life's work as is also the milieux both churchy and raunchy within which he lived that offers a fairly complete biography of the sort of life he livedHis early career was influenced by the resurgent Counter Reformation Catholic church that sought a style of art to counter the threat of Protestantism Caravaggio is generally credited with being part of the early Baroue movement Caravaggio's innovation was a radical naturalism that combined close physical observation with a dramatic even theatrical use of chiaroscuro which came to be known as tenebrism the shift from light to dark with little intermediate valueThe author pieces together circumstantial evidence to suggest that Caravaggio may have had a second avocation of pimping If so it helps to explain why he repeatedly is apprehended in the middle of the night prowling the streets curfew violation and armed with sword and dagger unlawful without a license I was interested to learn that Orazio Gentileschi was an acuaintance of Caravaggio's I've listened to the book The Passion of Artemisia which is a historical novel about Artemisia Gentileschi the daughter of Orazio Caravaggio was NOT involved in the notorious trial regarding the rape of Artemisia; however an excerpt from the trial records is included in this book in order to provide background information and an example of the dangers found in Rome in those daysThe artist community in the city of Rome of that era was filled with rivalries and jealousies that tended to lead to situations of slander and insult In retrospect it's almost predictable that an environment such as this would lead to homicide and indeed it did Caravaggio killed a man and fled the city to escape prosecution The story at the time was that it resulted from an argument about a tennis game The author sites evidence which indicates that it was actually a duel with swords involving two combatants two seconds who became involved in the fighting and four witnesses two on each side The cover story of a tennis game was used to avoid the laws against duelingAs an exile from Rome Caravaggio traveled to Naples and then Malta He was imprisoned in Malta for rowdy behavior and made a miraculous escape the details of which are unknown He escaped as a fugitive back to Sicily and then back to Naples where a gang probably sent from Malta attacked him held in down and carved cuts on his face to create scars In the author's opinion this cutting of the face was intended as payback for an insult given by Caravaggio to somebody from Malta The author who seems uite sure of himself provides the name of the person who had Caravaggio tracked downCaravaggio painted two paintings after being attacked and they show signs of being physically compromised the brushwork is so broad the definition of forms so unsure that the painter seems to have fallen prey to some form of essential tremor an uncontrollable shaking of the hands as well as perhaps to damage of the eyesCaravaggio's reputation as an accomplished painter enabled him to win prestigious and well paid commissions at all the places he visited after fleeing Malta even though he was a fugitive and probably knew that he was being tracked by Maltese agentsHe died reportedly due to a fever in 1610 during a trip back to Rome where he expected to receive a pardon arranged by powerful Roman friends It was from this later part of his life that he reportedly refused holy water at a church on the grounds that it was only good for washing away venial sins 'Mine are all mortal' were Caravaggio's words hardly those of a man untroubled by uestions of salvation or damnationThis book was published too early to include information about the recent findings of an excavated grave in Italy that is likely to be that of Caravaggio's Bones in the grave contained high lead levels which is probably related to the paints used at the time which contained high amounts of lead salts Thus it is likely that some of Caravaggio's violent behavior was caused by lead poisoningThis is a big book 514 pages including Notes Further Reading and Index that thoroughly covers the subject Insightful commentary is provided in the book for almost all of the surviving works of Caravaggio I believe these descriptions would be constructive reading for anyone who anticipates visiting a museum where the paintings are on display The rest of this review is focused on specific paintings by Caravaggio that I found to be of special interestOne reason for my interest in this book is the fact that the Nelson Atkins Museum of Art located in Kansas City near where I live contains within its collection the painting St John the Baptist by Caravaggio St John the Baptist by Caravaggio Nelson Atkins Museum of ArtThe following excerpt is what this book had to say about the above painting I have included it here so I can review it prior to my next visit to the museumIt was probably in the summer of 1604 between fights that Caravaggio painted the hauntingly intense St John the Baptist now in the Nelson Atkins Museum of Kansas City The picture was almost certainly painted for the Genoese banker Ottavio Costa There is an early copy in the church of the Oratory of the Confraternity of Conscente in Liguria which was a fief of the Costa dynasty The family had paid for the building of the church so it may be that Caravaggio's painting was originally destined for its high altar and subseuently replaced by the copy for reasons unknown Perhaps Ottavio Costa was so impressed by the work when he saw it that he decided to keep it for his art collection in RomeThe picture is very different to the St John the Baptist painted for Ciriaco Mattei a couple of years before As in the earlier painting the saint occupies an unusually lush desert wilderness Dock leaves grow in profusion at his feet But he is no longer an ecstatic laughing boy He has become a melancholy adolescent glowering in his solitude Clothed in animal furs and swathed in folds of blood red drapery he clutches a simple reed cross for solace as he broods on the errors and miseries of mankind The chiaroscuro is eerily extreme there is a pale cast to the light which is possibly intended to evoke moonbeams but the contrasts are so strong and the shadows so deep that the boy looks as though lit by a flash of lightning This dark but glowing painting is one of Caravaggio's most spectacular creations It is also a reticent and introverted work—a vision of a saint who looks away to one side rather than meeting the beholder's eye This second St John is moodily withdrawn lost in his own world despising thoughts The picture might almost be a portrait of Caravaggio's own dark state of mind his gloomy hostility and growing sense of isolation during this period of his life pg 277 278The following excerpt from the book tells of one occasion when Caravaggio's work was rejected because it portrayed St Matthew with too much appearance of a poor peasant instead of an important saint of the church I happen to be sympathetic with Caravaggio's preference to show the followers of Jesus as being plain and poor folk Despite or likely because of its brusue singularity Caravaggio's picture 'pleased nobody' according to Baglione The St Matthew was rejected as soon as it was delivered Bellori gave the fullest account of events 'Here something happened that greatly upset Caravaggio with respect to his reputation After he had finished the central picture of St Matthew and installed it on the altar the priests took it down saying that the figure with its legs grossed and its feet rudely exposed to the public had neither decorum nor the appearance of a saint That was of course precisely Caravaggio's point Christ and his followers looked a lot like beggars than cardinals But the decision of Mathieu Cointrel's executors was final Saving Caravaggio's blushes Vincenzo Giustiniani took the painting of St Matthew for his own collection Giustiniani also prevailed on the congregation of San Luigi dei Francesi to allow the painter to try againThe resulting picture his second version of St Matthew and the Angel was accepted without demur The character of the painting and indeed the very fact that it was commissioned at all suggests that those in charge of the commission had few doubts about the painter's ability As far as they were concerned it was merely his taste and the tenor of his piety that was suspect if he was given the right instruction these could easily be amended pg 236 237Here's the first version of St Matthew and the Angel Here's the second version of St Matthew and the Angel Caravaggio had some additional paintings rejected because of their realism In one case Mary is shown with cleavage and in another painting titled Death of the Virgin she is shown too dead An ascension scene was preferred Fearless (Long, Tall Texans, probably the darkest and most dangerous life of any of the great Bears From Gentle Pandas to Fearless Polar Bears painters The worlds of Milan and Rome through which Caravaggio moved and which Andrew Graham Dixon describes brilliantly in this book are th This is a biography of a gifted artist who unfortunately also Fearless possessed a CantLit proud and difficult The Right Stuff personality that got him into freuent trouble with the law Ironically much of what is known about Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio 1571–1610 comes to us from the criminal archives that document his freuent arrests and various depositions in legal interrogations Of course his Legacy Code (Legacy Code paintings are also a The Disconnected Generation permanent record of his life's work as is also the milieux both churchy and raunchy within which he lived that offers a fairly complete biography of the sort of life he livedHis early career was influenced by the resurgent Counter Reformation Catholic church that sought a style of art to counter the threat of Protestantism Caravaggio is generally credited with being Dungeoneer (Advanced Fighting Fantasy, part of the early Baroue movement Caravaggio's innovation was a radical naturalism that combined close Measurement for Evaluation in Kinesiology physical observation with a dramatic even theatrical use of chiaroscuro which came to be known as tenebrism the shift from light to dark with little intermediate valueThe author The Mars Room pieces together circumstantial evidence to suggest that Caravaggio may have had a second avocation of The Peaceable Kingdom pimping If so it helps to explain why he repeatedly is apprehended in the middle of the night Slammer prowling the streets curfew violation and armed with sword and dagger unlawful without a license I was interested to learn that Orazio Gentileschi was an acuaintance of Caravaggio's I've listened to the book The Passion of Artemisia which is a historical novel about Artemisia Gentileschi the daughter of Orazio Caravaggio was NOT involved in the notorious trial regarding the rape of Artemisia; however an excerpt from the trial records is included in this book in order to Erotically Incorrect provide background information and an example of the dangers found in Rome in those daysThe artist community in the city of Rome of that era was filled with rivalries and jealousies that tended to lead to situations of slander and insult In retrospect it's almost My Hot Date predictable that an environment such as this would lead to homicide and indeed it did Caravaggio killed a man and fled the city to escape And the Tide Comes In... prosecution The story at the time was that it resulted from an argument about a tennis game The author sites evidence which indicates that it was actually a duel with swords involving two combatants two seconds who became involved in the fighting and four witnesses two on each side The cover story of a tennis game was used to avoid the laws against duelingAs an exile from Rome Caravaggio traveled to Naples and then Malta He was imprisoned in Malta for rowdy behavior and made a miraculous escape the details of which are unknown He escaped as a fugitive back to Sicily and then back to Naples where a gang Daily Affirmations For Forgiving & Moving On probably sent from Malta attacked him held in down and carved cuts on his face to create scars In the author's opinion this cutting of the face was intended as Mara, Daughter of the Nile payback for an insult given by Caravaggio to somebody from Malta The author who seems uite sure of himself Single State of Mind provides the name of the نگاهی از درون به جنبش چپ ايران گفتگو با محسن رضوانی person who had Caravaggio tracked downCaravaggio Any Ordinary Day: Blindsides, Resilience and What Happens After the Worst Day of Your Life painted two Flavors of the Italian South paintings after being attacked and they show signs of being Portraits In Fiction physically compromised the brushwork is so broad the definition of forms so unsure that the The Good Man Jesus and the Scoundrel Christ painter seems to have fallen Sugar and Other Stories prey to some form of essential tremor an uncontrollable shaking of the hands as well as The Notorious Mrs. Clem perhaps to damage of the eyesCaravaggio's reputation as an accomplished Warriors in Winter (Magic Tree House painter enabled him to win Wunderland prestigious and well Annes Feelings paid commissions at all the وبلاگستان شهر شیشه‌ای places he visited after fleeing Malta even though he was a fugitive and Lot probably knew that he was being tracked by Maltese agentsHe died reportedly due to a fever in 1610 during a trip back to Rome where he expected to receive a Indian Art (Oxford History of Art) pardon arranged by Great Job, Dad! powerful Roman friends It was from this later The Book of Dreams part of his life that he reportedly refused holy water at a church on the grounds that it was only good for washing away venial sins 'Mine are all mortal' were Caravaggio's words hardly those of a man untroubled by uestions of salvation or damnationThis book was The Book of Dreams published too early to include information about the recent findings of an excavated grave in Italy that is likely to be that of Caravaggio's Bones in the grave contained high lead levels which is No Spin probably related to the Thank You for Smoking paints used at the time which contained high amounts of lead salts Thus it is likely that some of Caravaggio's violent behavior was caused by lead Amazon.com: Professional C poisoningThis is a big book 514 The Last Voyage of Poe Blythe pages including Notes Further Reading and Index that thoroughly covers the subject Insightful commentary is The First Wave provided in the book for almost all of the surviving works of Caravaggio I believe these descriptions would be constructive reading for anyone who anticipates visiting a museum where the The True History of Lyndie B. Hawkins paintings are on display The rest of this review is focused on specific A Skunk in My Bunk! paintings by Caravaggio that I found to be of special interestOne reason for my interest in this book is the fact that the Nelson Atkins Museum of Art located in Kansas City near where I live contains within its collection the Natures Calendar painting St John the Baptist by Caravaggio St John the Baptist by Caravaggio Nelson Atkins Museum of ArtThe following excerpt is what this book had to say about the above The Lost and the Lurking (Silver John, painting I have included it here so I can review it Travel Far and Mad Libs prior to my next visit to the museumIt was Religion Returns to the Public Square probably in the summer of 1604 between fights that Caravaggio Gamer Nation painted the hauntingly intense St John the Baptist now in the Nelson Atkins Museum of Kansas City The The Fall of the Romanovs picture was almost certainly The Treasure of Kafur painted for the Genoese banker Ottavio Costa There is an early copy in the church of the Oratory of the Confraternity of Conscente in Liguria which was a fief of the Costa dynasty The family had Reconstructed Lives paid for the building of the church so it may be that Caravaggio's World Literature and Dissent painting was originally destined for its high altar and subseuently replaced by the copy for reasons unknown Perhaps Ottavio Costa was so impressed by the work when he saw it that he decided to keep it for his art collection in RomeThe T. S. Eliots Dialectical Imagination picture is very different to the St John the Baptist The Emergence of Trans painted for Ciriaco Mattei a couple of years before As in the earlier I Burn for You (Primes, painting the saint occupies an unusually lush desert wilderness Dock leaves grow in Primal Heat (Primes, profusion at his feet But he is no longer an ecstatic laughing boy He has become a melancholy adolescent glowering in his solitude Clothed in animal furs and swathed in folds of blood red drapery he clutches a simple reed cross for solace as he broods on the errors and miseries of mankind The chiaroscuro is eerily extreme there is a El mundo amarillo (BEST SELLER) pale cast to the light which is My Invented Country possibly intended to evoke moonbeams but the contrasts are so strong and the shadows so deep that the boy looks as though lit by a flash of lightning This dark but glowing El sueño de una Estrella painting is one of Caravaggio's most spectacular creations It is also a reticent and introverted work—a vision of a saint who looks away to one side rather than meeting the beholder's eye This second St John is moodily withdrawn lost in his own world despising thoughts The Crave the Night picture might almost be a Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets (Harry Potter, portrait of Caravaggio's own dark state of mind his gloomy hostility and growing sense of isolation during this Future Letters period of his life A Mother’s Dilemma pg 277 278The following excerpt from the book tells of one occasion when Caravaggio's work was rejected because it Lady Renegade (Legacy Of The Blade, portrayed St Matthew with too much appearance of a Kerran Kuubassa poor The Dragons Tamer peasant instead of an important saint of the church I happen to be sympathetic with Caravaggio's Dragon Rider preference to show the followers of Jesus as being Passage to Freedom / Baseball Saved Us plain and The Amsterdam Connection poor folk Despite or likely because of its brusue singularity Caravaggio's Atlas of Operative Craniofacial Surgery picture 'pleased nobody' according to Baglione The St Matthew was rejected as soon as it was delivered Bellori gave the fullest account of events 'Here something happened that greatly upset Caravaggio with respect to his reputation After he had finished the central Sins, The Gita & Karma picture of St Matthew and installed it on the altar the Forward Me Back To You priests took it down saying that the figure with its legs grossed and its feet rudely exposed to the Maoism public had neither decorum nor the appearance of a saint That was of course Narwhal and Jelly Box Set (Books 1, 2, 3, and Poster) precisely Caravaggio's 雪村せんせいとケイくん [Yukimura sensei to Kei-kun] point Christ and his followers looked a lot like beggars than cardinals But the decision of Mathieu Cointrel's executors was final Saving Caravaggio's blushes Vincenzo Giustiniani took the I Am Kind painting of St Matthew for his own collection Giustiniani also 網內人 prevailed on the congregation of San Luigi dei Francesi to allow the Ask Me Why (Green Mountain, painter to try againThe resulting A Map to the Next World picture his second version of St Matthew and the Angel was accepted without demur The character of the Spin the Dawn (The Blood of Stars painting and indeed the very fact that it was commissioned at all suggests that those in charge of the commission had few doubts about the Why Nations Fail : The Origins of Power, Prosperity and Poverty painter's ability As far as they were concerned it was merely his taste and the tenor of his Life in the Skies piety that was suspect if he was given the right instruction these could easily be amended Firepower in Limited War pg 236 237Here's the first version of St Matthew and the Angel Here's the second version of St Matthew and the Angel Caravaggio had some additional Seven Wicked Nights (Turner, paintings rejected because of their realism In one case Mary is shown with cleavage and in another The Warlow Experiment painting titled Death of the Virgin she is shown too dead An ascension scene was The Quest For the Kid (The Explorers preferred

summary Caravaggio A Life Sacred and Profane

Caravaggio A Life Sacred and Profane

Th in suspicious circumstances off the coast of Naples Graham Dixon shows how Caravaggio’s paintings emerged from this extraordinarily wild and troubled life his detailed readings of them explain their originality and Caravaggio’s mentality better than any of his predecesso I know it's a cliche but facts about this artist's life are so few and far between he is very much like his own paintings emerging briefly every now and then from the dark out into daylightDetails of his early life are particularly sparse which made to me at least the first hundred or so pages of this biography hard going There's plenty about Milan and Rome folk art archbishops and cardinals but nothing substantial about the man himself The result is peculiar like a portrait painting without the portrait all setting but no face Once you get beyond that though Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio does begin to emerge and what a man he is For a start I'd forgotten just how far ahead of its time some of his work really was painted in the seventeenth century St John The Baptist say or David With The Head Of Goliath could have been done in the twentiethI was amazed too by his extraordinary life He strode about the seedier parts of town dressed in a cloak and armed with a sword; he killed an opponent in a duel although Graham Dixon argues convincingly that this was accidental and may have earned money as a pimp The most astonishing image of all though as unforgettable as any of his pictures is that of the great painter as fugitive on the run in fear of his life fleeing from city to city and everywhere he stopped painting a masterpieceI'm glad I didn't lose patience during those first hundred pages because this is as enthralling a biography of Caravaggio or anyone else for that matter as I've ever read Snow Dog paintings emerged from this extraordinarily wild and troubled life his detailed readings of them explain their originality and Caravaggio’s mentality better than any of his Girl Seven (London Underground, predecesso I know it's a cliche but facts about this artist's life are so few and far between he is very much like his own The Happiness Purpose paintings emerging briefly every now and then from the dark out into daylightDetails of his early life are A Candle For The Devil particularly sparse which made to me at least the first hundred or so Second Helpings of Roast Chicken pages of this biography hard going There's The Magic Potions Shop plenty about Milan and Rome folk art archbishops and cardinals but nothing substantial about the man himself The result is Reckless Karma (Sinners & Saints, peculiar like a A Girl Called Dog portrait Ashamed painting without the A Jealous Ghost portrait all setting but no face Once you get beyond that though Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio does begin to emerge and what a man he is For a start I'd forgotten just how far ahead of its time some of his work really was A Liverpool Lass painted in the seventeenth century St John The Baptist say or David With The Head Of Goliath could have been done in the twentiethI was amazed too by his extraordinary life He strode about the seedier Women and the National Experience parts of town dressed in a cloak and armed with a sword; he killed an opponent in a duel although Graham Dixon argues convincingly that this was accidental and may have earned money as a An Unsuitable Duchess pimp The most astonishing image of all though as unforgettable as any of his Monsieur Proust pictures is that of the great Hummelhonung painter as fugitive on the run in fear of his life fleeing from city to city and everywhere he stopped Old Yukon painting a masterpieceI'm glad I didn't lose Making As in College patience during those first hundred Angel of Brooklyn pages because this is as enthralling a biography of Caravaggio or anyone else for that matter as I've ever read

review ☆ E-book, or Kindle E-pub Ð Andrew Graham-Dixon

Ose of cardinals and prostitutes prayer and violence Graham Dixon puts the murder of a pimp Ranuccio Tomassoni at the centre of his story It occurred at the height of Caravaggio’s fame in Rome and probably brought about his flight through Malta and Sicily which led to his dea A spectacular biography in every way imaginable The author carefully puts together the historical record to provide as complete a picture of a complex troubled genius as is possibleMore importantly Graham Dixon illuminates each of Caravaggio's paintings in such clear historical literary and artistic detail that anyone familiar with these paintings will now see them with a depth they have never before experienced I already know that I will come back to it again and again in anticipation of any time I am fortunate enough to view Caravaggio's work in the future In fact as much as I have loved each of Caravaggio's paintings that I have seen in person I now know that I never uite appreciated the beauty and complexity of each The chronology used to describe the paintings—the stories behind each work—now put each into a context I had never before understood I can't wait to rediscover Caravaggio's art again after reading this bookGraham Dixon does not cover up any of the gritty or tragic details of Caravaggio's life nor does he resort to tabloid sensationalism We meet a very human Caravaggio whose brilliance is neither obscured by his troubled life experiences nor elevated to an idealized sainthoodToo often trite jokes are made about the value of art history I've been guilty myself of the same thing Graham Dixon's work will eliminate any notion of frivolity about the study of art history This is a serious work that will live for the ages It should become a standard for any professional or amateur student of art history Should others follow in the footsteps set by this example humanity will be better servedThis is a book that will remain with me for the rest of my life If you have ever been touched by a work of art you should read Caravaggio A Life Sacred and Profane Graham Dixon's account will stay with you long after you have finished reading it