Free read Tales of Ancient Egypt Puffin Classics ´ E-book, or Kindle E-pub

Roger Lancelyn Green ☆ 9 Free read

Tales of Ancient Egypt Puffin Classics

He creatures in the world; of Isis seaching the waters for her dead husband Osiris; of the Bennu Bird and the Book of Thoth But there are also tales told for pleasure about magic treasure and adventure even the first ever Cinderella stor So fun to read aloud Inspired good discussions comparing various other myths notably Greek and fairy tales Cinderella

characters Tales of Ancient Egypt Puffin Classics

Mething edgy for your bookshelf or just someone who tends to divert from the mainstream Puffin Pixels adds a sophisticated fresh flair to the canon to satisfy every readerThese stories include the great myths of Amen Ra who created all t Nice intro to Egyptian mythology A great read for young readers

Summary ¸ E-book, or Kindle E-pub ☆ Roger Lancelyn Green

Embrace your inner geek with Puffin PixelsPuffin Pixels is a new collection of classics featuring pixelated 8 bit video game cover artwork Whether you’re an adult nostalgic for video and computer games of the past a teen looking for so If I have ever read a book of Egyptian myths before I don’t remember it This little volume was a very pleasant introduction to the Egyptian mythos—something that I’ve learned by osmosis while reading books about the land’s history and art and reading fiction set in Ancient Egypt As in most mythologies there are unexpected treasuresThe man who polished these little tales was a friend of CS Lewis and seems to have made his reputation on rewriting myths and legends for the children’s market I realize now that the vocabulary of this volume was probably suitable for children but it did not detract from my enjoyment as an adult reader He blends history and myth to make both clearer for the readerI have always found the Ancient Egyptians to be fascinating—this volume merely reinforced my obsession


10 thoughts on “Tales of Ancient Egypt Puffin Classics

  1. says:

    If I have ever read a book of Egyptian myths before I don’t remember it This little volume was a very pleasant introduction to the Egyptian mythos—something that I’ve learned by osmosis while reading books about the land’s history and art and reading fiction set in Ancient Egypt As in most mythologies there are unexpected treasuresThe man who polished these little tales was a friend of CS Lewis and seems to have made his reputation on rewriting myths and legends for the children’s market I realize now that the vocabulary of this volume was probably suitable for children but it did not detract from my enjoyment as an adult reader He blends history and myth to make both clearer for the readerI have always found the Ancient Egyptians to be fascinating—this volume merely reinforced my obsession


  2. says:

    So Roger Lancelyn Green was in The Inklings Who knew? The Inklings right? That literary group CS Lewis and JRR Tolkien were in? With a bunch of other people everybody forgets? Well Roger Lancelyn Green was in it at least according to the Author File in the back of the Puffin book And Wikipedia Of course a little internet sleuthing said he wasn't a member but rather someone who was friends with other Inklings and occasionally attended their meetingsAlso he was the first one to read the Narnia series And give it the name The Chronicles of Narnia Dang it sounds like a member to meI've taught Ancient Egypt to middle school students for years now along with Ancient Mesopotamia The Ancient Indus Ancient China You know the big ones But there's so little time we can't really delve into it So pyramids mummies Nile pharaohs hieroglyphs and we're outAnd that's sad because Egypt lasted 4000 years Four THOUSAND I mean US History teachers get bent out of shape because their students don't know about the XYZ Affair or the Teapot Dome Scandal Can you imagine how the public school teachers in Ancient Egypt must have felt? All those little Egyptian kids screwing around all the time at their desks Putting a baby crocodile on the teacher's chairFour thousand years of continuous civilization Counting the Greeks and kindof counting the Romans Not counting the Arabs Sorry guysSo I'm a little bit shaky on some of my Ancient Egypt knowledge I'd never been reuired to read any of their myths so I hadn't Or at least I'd read very few I knew about the gods and could have listed several who they are what they did But I didn't really know the storiesAnd the stories are fascinatingI'd be interested in seeing a direct translation now that I've read this for several reasonsFirst there's so much that overlaps with Biblical narrative In the story Ra and his Children for instance so much seemed similar to Genesis The creation of the world separating night from day creating man and woman People rebelling against Ra and did evil in his sight worshipping the dragon of darkness I mean there are some differences in the Bible when the people turn evil God saves them with an ark In Ancient Egypt Ra saves them with beer so there's thatHere's another one from the story The Land of the Dead and humans are being judged Among the things they say at judgement I have given bread to the hungry water to the thirsty clothing to the naked and a boat to him who could not cross the River This is very similar to Christ's discussion of the judgement in Matt 25 And later in the same story we hear of Apophis the snake the eater of souls who dwelt in the Pits of Fire Yeah sounds familiar I've been told not to be afraid of anyone who can kill me but I should be afraid of the One who can destroy both my soul and body in HellAnd Christ did spend some time in Egypt right? Right? Now I'm not claiming Christ is taking Egyptian belief and turning it into some sort of Judeo Egyptian syncretistic religion or anything like that I'm sure others have already said that I'm just saying I found it interesting and I'd also be interested in reading the direct translationsOk here's one from the story The Taking of Joppa The Egyptians are up in Palestine trying to get Joppa and the governor says I swear to Jahwah my god that you shall be second only to myself in this new kingdom which we shall carve out of dat da dat da daaa Did the Ancient Egyptian texts reference Jahwah? Or did Green add that to the story to give it an extra sense of veracity? And if he added that did he add the other stuff? A uick search tells me he didn't add everything But still interestedSide note that Jahwah part reminded me of Indiana Jones But in the Latin alphabet Jehovah begins with an IAs for the book and the myths I found them fascinating I'll probably read them again sometime soon And I may give one or two to my class to read Don't let the cover fool you though This would be a challenging read for a good many middle school students Here's a sentence from the first page of the introduction The first Greek historian whose works survive Herodotus visited it in about 450 BC and found that only priests could still read the ancient hieroglyphs in which inscriptions had been carved or written on the monuments since the days when Menes the first historical Pharaoh united the 'Two Lands' in about 3200 BCOr this one The natural conditions in any land are often to a large extent responsible for its religious beliefs the form its civilization takes and the stories that evolve into its literatureSo I might not go into buying this book thinking it will definitely be worth having your students read it But for the teacher who is unfamiliar with the myths of Ancient Egypt it's a great intro


  3. says:

    If you're deeply interested in Ancient Egypt stories mythology etc you'll find this book very interesting and informative Except the last chapter it is uite interesting; it refers papyruses drawings and scriptions and that makes the impression book gives like a documentary then a usual story books Language is OK but in my opinion you need to have a map of Egypt in your mind while reading the book I was trying to match the story with the location told in the final chapters Knowingor believingthat these stories were actually lived I liked that feeling


  4. says:

    Gods of their own making A book I picked up years ago because it sounded interesting was Tales of Ancient Egypt by Roger Lancelyn Green At long last I finished reading it this week The prologue explains the ancient civilization was “the most self contained of all the countries of the ancient world; it lived its own life practiced its own religion and made up its own stories”First conuered by the Greeks and then the Romans many of Egypt’s stories were lost Those that survived were hidden in its hieroglyphs rediscovered in modern times The stories in this collection were carved on tablets or painted on papyrus by Egyptians or preserved by Greek historiansBut all were recorded by or for the pleasure of the ruling class and reflect their narrow perspectives There are peasants included but none rise above their station unless gifted with uncommon beauty or prophesy The slaves who built the great pyramids and temples pass through unseenThese stories and fables provide a fascinating glimpse into ancient Egyptian history and culture as perceived by those who benefited most A single line repeated again and again throughout the stories and reigns the first words uttered in the presence of a Pharaoh “Life health and strength be to you” speaks volumes


  5. says:

    These stories were interesting but pretty hard to read and remember everything for the age level it was reuired for Pretty tedious reading I read most of them out loud with my son as it was pretty difficult reading levelLearned a lot and it was interesting


  6. says:

    Nice intro to Egyptian mythology A great read for young readers


  7. says:

    For the beginning reader of Ancient Egyptian lore this is a wonderful starter book that dives into some of the most common stories that can be found in the land of pyramids desert and exotic gods What makes it so intriguing to the reader is the fact that the author has compiled it so that it follows a certain timeline within its section of stories although without using dates What disappointed me the most is the fact that there are actually lore from Ancient Egypt then what was provided for but I guess for the sake of simplifying everything the author chose to stick with the Osirian cycle of deities At the same time for those that were used it would have made it a lot easier for the reader if there was a glossary of mentioned deities in the back with a small trivia background Further the deities weren't really discussed in their animal headed or animal personas which is what differentiates them from most other mythoi types There were a few uick mentions and the interesting discussion of Set's strange animal head but not enough to bring the reader into the true flesh of the times And finally about the stories themselves Hatshepsut's story shouldn't haven't been included if you were to go along with the Ancient Egyptian belief especially of her heir Thutmose III who attempted to wipe her out stating that she wasn't an actual pharaoh At the same time there were a few other stories that I hadn't heard of and I don't know if I would have included them just since of the controversial side of their actual origins Roger has proved that he is a lot better in his preservation and re telling of the stories when compared to those of Edith Hamilton And although they were bland and too lengthy in some cases it may be considered a compliment in the keeping of the actual format of the majority of the stories Finally there is a bit of a gruesome side to some of the stories so it is with precaution that the reader picks this book up and reads it but be assured of these stories have been uite cleaned up from their original telling


  8. says:

    for school


  9. says:

    So fun to read aloud Inspired good discussions comparing various other myths notably Greek and fairy tales Cinderella


  10. says:

    ‘ Tales from Ancient Egypt’ offers a collection of easy readable stories presenting a wonderful introduction to the legends and legacy of Ancient Egypt for children and adults alike The way Roger Lancelyn Green has penned down these stories makes them read like fairytales cautionary tales about the value of honor friendship and loyalty With each story only taking about ten pages or less they do sometimes regrettably lack in details due their short span Yet they remain thoroughly entertaining striking stories that in essence still hold great literary value; and stories that are told elaborately stick out for being so much engaging The tragic attempt of Nefrekeptah to obtain the mysterious Book of Toth has a wonderfully gothic feel to it and forms one of the high points within this collection mainly because Green takes his time to tell this story so passionately The mix of tales about creation adventures from civilian and military Egyptians and the magical encounters various Pharaohs had with their gods makes for a varied read with each story being significantly different from the previous one The retellings of the birth of Egypt and its gods might hold nothing new to readers already familiar with Egypt culture but for them the lesser known stories about the brothers Anpu and Bata or the tale of Hatshepsut’s birth might hold something new And even if one’s already acuainted with most of these tales it’s still a pleasure to relive them through this bundleCombined with a timeline and an overview of ruling Pharaohs and their architectonic achievements this book offers a little extra for readers eager to dive deeper into the historical angle of this book For the rest though it can simply be read as a collection of wonderful short stories and fairytales who at once feel familiar and yet brand new


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