Free download ¾ Edouard Manet Rebel in a Frock Coat

Beth Archer Brombert ä 5 Read

S a complex and contradictory character who suffered from syphilis and had an illegitimate so Reviewing this book

Download Edouard Manet Rebel in a Frock Coat

Edouard Manet Rebel in a Frock Coat

This text examines Manet's relationships with his parents with his secret adopted son and wit A thoughtful analys

Free download Ä PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB free ä Beth Archer Brombert

H his wife and lovers Also covered are his friendships with Beaudelaire and Zola He emerges a I started reading t


7 thoughts on “Edouard Manet Rebel in a Frock Coat

  1. says:

    A thoughtful analysis that arises from exceptionally detailed readings of the majority of Manet's works gets bogged down by two factors the middling uality of the works reproduced in the book which prevents the reader perceiving many of the observations from the text for himself granted that the book was printed in 1997; and the constant impression of sentimentality that is that Manet's familial relationships and emotional life are being stressed even than is credible just a little but always soI disagree deeply with certain implications in this biography but love it all the for the conviction of its analysisIn a detailed thorough biography Beth Archer Brombert convincingly places the art of Edouard Manet in historical context His family his friends and his contemporaries come to life at times in rapid fire staggeringly exuisite characterizations Friends and Models Chapter 11 In tying Manet's life to his art in order to establish the meaning of both Brombert pushes the analysis of certain relationships and works just a step too far but such scratches in her compellingly comprehensive analysis tend to pollute the tone of the narrative locally rather than damaging the beauty of her understanding of Manet the Frenchman and the universal artist Despite a number of thought provoking objections which can be expounded here solid and fascinating analysis reigns throughout this well written biographyIn relating Manet's interactions with E'mile Zola his first prominent and most important supporter Brombert no less than four times veers towards what might be considered character assassination of Zola Her proof of his deceitfulness pg 410 is actually dependent on attitudes that have been uestionably cultivated by the author herself previouslyBerthe Morisot the closest friend and dearest love whom Manet could not marry because of the need to do right by his son and his first love is the subject of a great many of the artist's works but an even greater percentage of this biography Although Morisot directly affected many of Manet's earlier and middle works as a model and kindred artist and even though she drew closer to Edouard through her marriage to his brother Euge'ne the author tends to get bogged down in rather boring historical circumstances of the Morisot family and worse step by step descriptions of Berthe's melancholy It goes not too far beyond but beyond the point at which any of it has to do with Manet and his artManet's first and chosen teacher Thomas Couture who is rendered fairly and sympathetically suffers when Brombert claims that it is not hard to see Couture in the role of surrogate father pg 48 Nothing suggests that he was than a figure against which to rebel someone earlier in the history of art a confident teacher who cultivated a student's free intellect despite or perhaps through several anecdotal incidents To call him a surrogate father because a father might have played the same role among many others is distracting not least from Edouard's turbulent relationship with his actual father at that time Likewise Brombert over reaches by suggesting that Suzanne Leenhoff childhood piano teacher turned wife might be seen as a second mother Both of these detract from the understanding of Manet's personality and fail to apply to his artWorse than the mischaracterization of certain people in Manet's life are analyses of the art that bend out of alignment with the entire work The author takes pains to show she is not comparing Manet to Christ on pg 419 when she writes He had been mocked insulted reviled rejected Why would he not have been haunted by the image of a suffering Christ? Manet's ingenious use of an historical form in painting and his lifelong loyal best friend Antonin Proust as a model suffers because in taking pains not to identify Manet with Christ the author has done just that striking a weird tone that does not contribute to her overall argumentMost alarming of all is the almost judgmental tone the text takes towards Suzanne Manet's wife and Le'on his son for not being themselves great artists This happens particularly in the chapter entitled The Family Beware the Family This comment made after Manet's death and the dispersal of his works by Degas friend and contemporary of Manet and his family illuminates several things the kind of irony beloved by Manet Degas' personality and the circumstances of various French artists at the time Yet having effectively demonstrated that Suzanne's and Le'on's continued and desired influence in Manet's work only served to reveal an inability to be very enthusiastic on all parts Brombert seems to imply that Suzanne and Le'on in the wake of Edouard's death might have some kind of responsibility to art historians or future collectors than to themselves Even if it might be true isn't it still arrogant to imply that a scholar than a century later or even a friend at the time understand a man intimately than his own wife and son? Problems with the argument aside this chapter was a joy to read as it thoroughly spins the meaning of Degas' uoteThese pitfalls really are exceptions to sparkling analyses of Manet's great works So heavy are many of the masterpieces that it is easier to examine some works of less centrality Politically motivated paintings like The Battle of the Kearsage and the Alabama The Execution of Emperor Maximilian The Barricade and above all Bon Bock benefit from an honest and scholarly analysis of the way they invoke and even exerted direct influence on the politics and society of both France and the world The works serve only the artist himself That they also served his contemporaries and posterity is only a measure of his artistic success Brombert enables the reader even with very little previous knowledge of all these events to appreciate Manet's accomplishment in appropriate context Critically her analysis reveals how Manet created powerful meaning in these works THROUGH innovations in perspective composition and color that were to mark the beginning of modernismConspicuously absent from the thoroughgoing discussion of the majority of Manet's works is much response to his most famous one the Bar at the Folies Berge're which is acknowledged by some biographical information but little discussion of the work itself This may have been a choice to avoid what has been done elsewhere ad nauseum yet I as an interested amateur had hoped to find chapters of discussion on this work in particular In fact that is exactly what the jacket would have a prospective reader believe that the contents are for amateur and expert alike This omission at any rate is balanced by loving attention to many smaller works such as the still life of almond shells see belowAlthough Manet's real achievements were in painting the human figure a mark of an artist's ability mostly avoided by his friends the Impressionists and less than stimulating in the hands of other artists of his day Manet from time to time painted still lifes Even these still lifes resound with Manet's art A brilliant example of the author's unified reading of his work in terms of art history personal history French society emotional empathy the techniue of painting and color theory can be found on pg 302 Here Brombert ties a minor still life of some unripe almonds to the artist's apathy his lack of any inspiration at all as a result of a kind of depression Since he was copying part of one of his previous works an unusual practice for him but not uncommon at some point for most artists he really is expressing dejection at his abuse over the previous years at the hands of officials and critics Manet's sad pensiveness was only magnified by the painting's timing at the end of that very French extended summer vacation at the seashore one which left him lonely and homesick each year even in the midst of family and relaxation None of this is lost in Brombert's analysis and not wanting to leave it up to speculation the author ties it to techniue and color the fuzzy gray green husk may have presented an interesting technical challenge but is has none of the sensuality of his flower paintings with their tragic awareness of death; none of the opulence of his fish and seafood or the succulence of his other fruits set on meticulously detailed tablecloths Dazzlingly Brombert places this painting suarely in line with Berthe Morisot's comparison of Manet's work to 'a wild or even a not uite ripe fruit' a uote about which she has written earlier in the biography Besides opening a window on the rest of his still lifes Brombert has proven that the smallest least inspired of his works deeply expresses the artist's heart his philosophy his life and times from the relationship of color and light to that of people families and societyIn short Edouard Manet Rebel in a Frock Coat bursts with invigorating analysis of the artist and his art If it has any flaw it is that the analysis is too good at times reuiring a healthy dose of critical thought The author may nearly have a biography of Berthe Morisot already and hopefully she will never write one of Zola but she would be hard pressed to improve what she has written here


  2. says:

    It's hard for us today to realize how extraordinarily radical the Impressionists were back in the late 1800s Today anything goes Back then not so Art was formulaic and usually based on historical and religious themes The Impressionists broke that mold and the one who started it all was Edouard Manet who's recognized at the first modern painter Unfortunately he was despised perhaps even hated by most of his contemporaries When you look at his paintings it's hard to see what caused the negative reaction The man was obviously a genius and probably one of the greatest painters of all time So why was he so vilified? That's where Brombert's book comes in She brilliantly lays the groundwork to understand why and why Manet's paintings were so radical She weaves together the many threads of Parisian society artistic theory Manet's life the art works he produced and their intellectual background and the many artists writers and musicians he knew and their interactions which were not always smooth Her book is an extraordinary accomplishment


  3. says:

    I started reading this book after visiting an exhibit of Manet's work at the Art Institute of Chicago I was trying to fill in the gaps of Manet's private life that were left by the exhibit This book filled those gaps really well It was great at helping me understand the why of so much of the discord in his life Placing his life and works in time with historical events was very eye opening and enlightening The author references personal letters and writings as well as other public records to tell the story within the story It's a fascinating book As other reviewers have noted it's a shame that there isn't representation of the works mentioned in the text I spent uite a bit of time searching for works mentioned on my phone while reading


  4. says:

    The Police wrote a song called “Too Much Information” That’s how I felt after reading this exhaustive biography of Manet Parts of it were very good but I found myself skimming through other parts The result is I know what Manet did in his life but who he was still remains a mystery Wish the reproductions of his work had been in color However if you admire Manet’s work this biography is worth a look


  5. says:

    Reviewing this book is problematic It is well written and Brombert’s research seems grounded but I had a lot of trouble finishing it Brombert deftly blends fine details about Parisian history culture and politics but it’s almost too much to take in The high points of this tome were the discussions of Manet’s works themselves She clearly outlines his historical sources and symbolism for example explaining that Gare Saint Lazare 1873 is a continuation of Velasuez’s exploration of mirrored space Las Meninas In Gare Saint Lazare Manet mirrors “the complexities of the mind” Painted around the time the artist turned 40 its theme is the passing of time and transit nature of life smoke symbolizing the passing of time; the puppy symbolizing infancy; the child representing childhood; and Victorine the famous courtesan and model of Olympia now captured about to turn thirty representing adulthood I would recommend this book to someone wanting to gain a breadth of knowledge on this artist but I found Ross King’s The Judgment of Paris to be a much enjoyable read


  6. says:

    Beth Archer Brombert in her biography “Edouard Manet Rebel in a Frock Coat” overcomes two common drawbacks for me of Art books to produce an appealing and appreciative characterization of Manet the artist and Manet the man The drawbacks are there – poorly reproduced and positioned plates of referenced art works and droning nearly baseless psychological interpretations of the artist's work which have the ring of patients responding to Rorschach inkblots but Brombert renders them relatively innocuous thanks to her thorough research and nice balance of artistic exposition and biographical pertinence to convey a portrait of Manet as determined dignified engaging talented and most of all sincere


  7. says:

    A well researched description of Parisian society in the mid 1850s with Manet as a central figure With plenty of money from his parents Manet was always able to dress well and to afford large studios and multiple mistresses Although very talented painting was also his way to break away from his father's plans for him to be a lawyer He died of syphilis at age 51


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *