FREE READ ✓ Dinosaurs in the Attic An Excursion into the American Museum of Natural History

Douglas Preston ☆ 0 FREE READ

Collection every assembled Written by former Natural History columnist Douglas Preston who worked at the American Muse Dinosaurs in the Attic is split into two parts The first part gives an overview of the history of the American Museum of Natural History in New York City The second part is a collection of random stories about some of the museum’s artifacts The writing style is excellent I found it hard to put the book down which is uite unusual for me reading a nonfiction book It made me want to go visit the museum one day which I just may be able to arrange very soon during a long layover in NYC on my way to Ireland I highly recommend it to anyone interested in the behind the scenes of museums Spank! split into two parts The first part gives an overview of the history of the American Museum of Natural History in New York City The Prison Ramen second part is a collection of random Saints and Misfits stories about Macroeconomics (7th Edition) some of the museum’s artifacts The writing Godzilla Returns style is excellent I found it hard to put the book down which is uite unusual for me reading a nonfiction book It made me want to go visit the museum one day which I just may be able to arrange very Shiki the Shikigami and the Tower of Depravity: Book One: Sticky Situation (English Edition) soon during a long layover in NYC on my way to Ireland I highly recommend it to anyone interested in the behind the Operation Kangaroo Trap scenes of museums

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Dinosaurs in the Attic An Excursion into the American Museum of Natural History

Um of Natural History for seven years this is a celebration of the best known and best loved museum in the United State A really interesting and enjoyable look at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City This was written by Douglas Preston who worked at the museum for seven years and is also the author along with Lincoln Child of one of my favorite series of thriller novels the Pendergast stories I can see now where Preston obtained a lot of his background information for the series and for some of his other novels such as Tyrannosaur Canyon and The Ice Limit Of course many of the Pendergast stories took place in the museum including Relic Reliuary Dance of Death and Book of the Dead The museum is also the setting for the popular movie Night at the Museum starring Ben Stiller and Robin WilliamsThe book chronicles how the museum came to be and how its many collections were obtained In its early years the museum sponsored expeditions to obtain dinosaur fossils acuire specimens from all over the world including Africa South America and Asia and to explore uncharted areas of the earth like the Arctic Much insightful and interesting information about the explorers and museum curators is included One of the most interesting was Roy Chapman Andrews who was the real person who Indiana Jones was modeled after He led an expedition for the museum to Outer Mongolia in search of dinosaur fossils and the missing link which was uite successful Along the way he had to fight off banditshe dressed with a gun at his hip and a rifle at the readyThe book goes on to describe the museum's many collections including fossils mammals insects birds reptiles anthropological exhibits meteorites and gems Another interesting story related tells of the great jewel robbery of 1964 where many of the museum's priceless jewels were stolen very reminiscent of Dance of Death by Preston Child Overall I really enjoyed this and would recommend it to anyone interested in natural history or any fan of the PrestonChild novels

READ & DOWNLOAD Dinosaurs in the Attic An Excursion into the American Museum of Natural History

Dinosaurs in the Attic is a chronicle of the expeditions discoveries and scientists behind the greatest natural history Now this was satisfying from nearly beginning to end It's a look at New York City's natural history museum split into two parts The first is a straightforward history of the institution both how it came about as well as how the philosophy of managing an enormous natural history collection developed over the years The second half is a look at some of the specific pieces in the collection selected to illustrate various aspects of the mission of the museum And let me stress it had A LOT of Ripley's Believe It Or Not type trivia facts Isn't that what really sparks the interest of a six year old kid in a museum in the first place? And did you know there are broken plaster casts of dinosaurs buried in Central Park? Coincidentally this book was written in the mid 80s which was about the time I first became very familiar with the AMNH and shortly before the explosion of brightly colored and loud interactive displays at museums I know I'm a curmudgeon but I cannot express how much I hate that trend in museums Oftentimes the display is broken to begin with and even if it's not I'm put off by how manky all the buttons and screens are after having been touched by countless grabby people many of whom would seem to have recently eaten greasy food In addition to being generally informative I loved this book because it created such a vivid picture of the natural history museums I remember Museums where you were supposed to be uiet and contemplative and smell like floor polish If you need me I'll be yelling at kids to get off my lawnGrade ARecommended To armchair naturalists fans of natural history museums and people who enjoy reminiscing about New York City cultural touchstones200811


10 thoughts on “Dinosaurs in the Attic An Excursion into the American Museum of Natural History

  1. says:

    Now this was satisfying from nearly beginning to end It's a look at New York City's natural history museum split into two parts The first is a straightforward history of the institution both how it came about as well as how the philosophy of managing an enormous natural history collection developed over the years The second half is a look at some of the specific pieces in the collection selected to illustrate various aspects of the mission of the museum And let me stress it had A LOT of Ripley's Believe It Or Not type trivia facts Isn't that what really sparks the interest of a six year old kid in a museum in the first place? And did you know there are broken plaster casts of dinosaurs buried in Central Park? Coincidentally this book was written in the mid 80s which was about the time I first became very familiar with the AMNH and shortly before the explosion of brightly colored and loud interactive displays at museums I know I'm a curmudgeon but I cannot express how much I hate that trend in museums Oftentimes the display is broken to begin with and even if it's not I'm put off by how manky all the buttons and screens are after having been touched by countless grabby people many of whom would seem to have recently eaten greasy food In addition to being generally informative I loved this book because it created such a vivid picture of the natural history museums I remember Museums where you were supposed to be uiet and contemplative and smell like floor polish If you need me I'll be yelling at kids to get off my lawnGrade ARecommended To armchair naturalists fans of natural history museums and people who enjoy reminiscing about New York City cultural touchstones200811


  2. says:

    I have a whole new appreciation for the museum now First of all they is so much there than I ever realized There are 2 million butterflies the skeletons of 100 elephants 60000 fish in jars of alcohol a grasshopper found on the observation deck of the Empire State building 4000 Asian shadow puppets 8 million anthropological artifacts and the list goes on and on A tiny fraction of all that's housed in the museum is out on display which is shocking considering how much is on displayNot only is there an overwhelming amount of items at the museum but I had no idea just how much work and devotion went into the collections The dirt on the ground of any one of the many stuffed animal displays is the actual dirt from where than animal was collected The entire scene is an exact replication down to the way the tree branch is bent and the way the smoke from the volcano is billowing in the background I had also always assumed that the museum just gather up collections from other people I didn't realize just how much of the collection was gathered by the museum itself The first half of the book is filled with tales of adventure from museum sponsored expeditionsIn short this is a fun read with lots of random tidbits If you've been too or plan to visit the American Natural History Museum it's well worth a read


  3. says:

    Douglas Prestonn was on the staff of the Amer Museum of Natural History and authored a monthly column on the Museum in Natural History' magazine This was his first book Lincoln Child was the editor This is how the team of PrestonChild became partners in mystery writing Child became so interested in the American Museum of Natural Hisotry and all it's many stories and secrets after reading Preston's book that he knew they had a winner if they could join forces and use the Museum in their mystery stories Just the architecture of the building itself lends itself to the noir I was captivated by the many secrets and facts that Preston presents to the reader to explain how the American Museum of Natural History was started how the collections were amassed and the importance of the Natural History Museum He envokes a visit to the Museum to view the articles he tells the facinating stories aboutThis was a well written review of some of the authors favorite auisition stories or what he feels are the most interesting items in the different halls of the museum He researched investigated and interviewed to collect his information Then he presented it in a very enjoyable read


  4. says:

    Dinosaurs in the Attic is split into two parts The first part gives an overview of the history of the American Museum of Natural History in New York City The second part is a collection of random stories about some of the museum’s artifacts The writing style is excellent I found it hard to put the book down which is uite unusual for me reading a nonfiction book It made me want to go visit the museum one day which I just may be able to arrange very soon during a long layover in NYC on my way to Ireland I highly recommend it to anyone interested in the behind the scenes of museums


  5. says:

    Great read if a little outdated Some of the halls he mentions like the Hall of North American Birds sadly don't exist any at the Museum As a former volunteer it was great to read about some of my favorite artifacts and how they got into their respective exhibits


  6. says:

    what joy it would be to visit the actual museum


  7. says:

    As a kid I read any story I could get my hands on about archeological expeditions survival under harsh conditions and intrepid explorers I devoured drama in the Gobi desert; pack ice and bitter cold above the Arctic Circle and in Antarctica and Dinosaurs in the Attic is the adult version of those tales The 1st half of the book details some of the expeditions underwritten and staffed by the US Museum of Natural History; the 2nd part dives into some of the lesser known collections Who knew a single obscure species of bug could be so important? Best of all Dinosaurs in the Attic shows these expeditions these collections are valuable not just for the artifacts or numbers of species brought back to the Museum but how they allow research into natural history and vanished cultures to continue and expand as new scientific analysis tools develop Groundbreaking research was done on animal or insect species when the collections were first assembled; now new research can be done using DNA analysis providing amazing new insights


  8. says:

    Definitely an interesting read although I was a bit underwhelmed at how much of the controversy surrounding the anthropology collection was brushed aside There would have been space to delve a bit into the ethical uestions raised by museum collecting practices particularly in the early days so parts come across as being a bit tone deaf Whether or not this was the author's decision or an editorial choice is unclear as he certainly addresses these issues in his fiction set in the museum Otherwise definitely a fun book for museum lovers


  9. says:

    A really interesting and enjoyable look at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City This was written by Douglas Preston who worked at the museum for seven years and is also the author along with Lincoln Child of one of my favorite series of thriller novels the Pendergast stories I can see now where Preston obtained a lot of his background information for the series and for some of his other novels such as Tyrannosaur Canyon and The Ice Limit Of course many of the Pendergast stories took place in the museum including Relic Reliuary Dance of Death and Book of the Dead The museum is also the setting for the popular movie Night at the Museum starring Ben Stiller and Robin WilliamsThe book chronicles how the museum came to be and how its many collections were obtained In its early years the museum sponsored expeditions to obtain dinosaur fossils acuire specimens from all over the world including Africa South America and Asia and to explore uncharted areas of the earth like the Arctic Much insightful and interesting information about the explorers and museum curators is included One of the most interesting was Roy Chapman Andrews who was the real person who Indiana Jones was modeled after He led an expedition for the museum to Outer Mongolia in search of dinosaur fossils and the missing link which was uite successful Along the way he had to fight off banditshe dressed with a gun at his hip and a rifle at the readyThe book goes on to describe the museum's many collections including fossils mammals insects birds reptiles anthropological exhibits meteorites and gems Another interesting story related tells of the great jewel robbery of 1964 where many of the museum's priceless jewels were stolen very reminiscent of Dance of Death by Preston Child Overall I really enjoyed this and would recommend it to anyone interested in natural history or any fan of the PrestonChild novels


  10. says:

    This book is a fun punch bowl of facts about one of my favorite museums But there is one turd swimming around in it a casual attitude about the racism built into institutions of this type Example in the introduction the author boasts that the AMNH includes in its collection 100 complete elephants and the largest skeletal collection of Manhattan aborigines among others Try substituting the word Jews for Manhattan Aborigines and you can imagine the uproar that would understandably follow such insensitivity Keep in mind that whites would sometimes cut the heads off Native warriors fallen on the battlefield and sell their heads to museumsWhile Preston writes extensively about how a white scientist went unpunished for the murder of his Indigenous guide in the Arctic he sweeps the dirty story of the Museum's treatment of a little Inuk boy under the rug In 1897 Robert E Peary deposited six Indigenous people from northern Greenland at the Museum living specimens for scientific study AND public display Minik's father was among the four who died within the first year and the Museum lied to the 7 year old Minik about what they were doing with his father's remains See the book Give Me My Father's Body statue in front of the Museum Teddy Roosevelt who helped decimate the elephant population of Africa depicts the President astride a horse with a Native American and an African standing sans horses next to him This says it all the white man uber alles Native activists and their allies have demanded its removal Getting rid of this statue would be an act of education and redemption As well the Museum should 'fess up to its crimes return the sacred remains of the Indigenous peoples it has callously harvested along with insects monkeys and rocks and apologize profusely and publicly for its role in the suppression of Native peoples and people of color around the globe It's a great place for learning the Museum and it needs to learn a few lessons itself Preston's book is not a help in this regard


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