Boundless Tracing Land and Dream in a New Northwest Passage summary ☆ eBook, ePUB or Kindle PDF



10 thoughts on “Boundless Tracing Land and Dream in a New Northwest Passage

  1. says:

    Afforded the opportunity to take passage on a ship journeying through the Northwest passage Winter jumps at the chance What follows are her thoughts on the land fellow passengers the ship itself and the connectedness to the land the animals and those who journeyed here before her many such as the Franklin Expedition who lost their livesPart travelogue part memoir this lyrical book written with uiet elegance and poetic beauty really appealed to me Her musings and thoughts about so many things the two Inuit women on the ship who really helped her understand their diminishing culture the geologist who taught her the importance of rocks a musician who became a real friend and the things she sees and feels struck just the right chord This book makes one think of one's relation to the land they live in the original people who belong to the Arctic and what is being taken away What we are willing to do to keep and further the lifestyles in which we live Such a beautifully described journey which also triggered memories from Winter's own past The pictures included in the book are wonderfulThis journey changed the way the author looked at things her relationship with the past and the land people's cultures I loved it and keep thinking about the uestions posed from reading this book maybe it changed me a little too


  2. says:

    BoundlessKathleen Winter’s subtitle is ‘Adventures in the Northwest Passage’ At times she refers to her journey as an expedition I don’t mean to be unkind but it’s not an expedition In 2010 she is invited to be writer in residence on a commercial cruise ship full of paying guests who are mainly it would seem Japanese They are accompanied by experts in geology crafts history and so on and are taken on guided walks in each port of call This is not an expedition Winter describes each port and her experiences there the people she meets on land and sea while musing about her early childhood in Northumberland England before her parents decided to move the family across to Newfoundland She reflects on the difficulty of not belonging either by nationality birth social group or expectations Her father sought wild Canada and dreamed of hunting fishing and cross country treks so that is what they did as a family whenever possible She is excited about following Franklin’s passage and talks a little about the efforts that have been made to find his ships Because the book was written in 2015 it precedes them being located It also predates the findings of a court case that the grounding of the cruise ship on rocks just before they reached their final destination was due to the Captain’s lack of adeuate research preparation prior to the voyage and was not the fault of the coastguard or of outdated mapsI found this a contradictory journey There are the usual musings about climate change colonial arrogance abuse of indigenous peoples and the lack of respect for their history knowledge and artefacts that always accompany journeys into the far north Yet Winter is travelling on an environmentally unfriendly cruise ship that stops in each port just long enough for the mainly elderly passengers to disembark and find ‘native’ crafts to buy Where there are no inhabitants passengers bring back on board twigs leaves bones feathers and anything else of interest that they find to lay on a show and tell table I believe in ‘take only photographs leave only footprints’ and would have expected Winter to have believed in that too but she joins in rather than discouraging the practice She prowls around towns and villages and yet she can identify with the local people having spent some of her childhood in a town that was accustomed to but despised visitors poking around peering in windows and observing townspeople as if they were exhibits in a museum She talks about a journey she made with her older daughter to England during which if her account is accurate their reactions to the sites they visited was often truly immature and disrespectful uite the opposite of how she is imploring people to respond to the far northThis is not a bad book but it isn’t what I expected There is too much soul searching too much trying to work out her own feelings about her childhood her family her marriages and her future The journey was interesting enough but the means and the reminiscences weren’t


  3. says:

    BOTW Teresa Gallagher reads Kathleen Winter's story of her journey as the Writer in Residence on a boat travelling through the Northwest Passage and how the voyage became as much an exploration of her own roots as a venture into the arctic ice fieldsKathleen Winter was born in Bill uay near Gateshead When she was still young the family emigrated to Newfoundland Winter who now lives in Montreal was a TV scriptwriter and a newspaper columnist before turning her hand to short stories Her first collection of stories 'boYs' was published in 2007 and her first novel 'Annabel' came out three years later'Annabel' was shortlisted for the three main Canadian literary prizes in 2010 the Scotiabank Giller Prize the Rogers' Writers' Trust Prize and the Governor General's Award This year Boundless was shortlisted for the RBC Taylor Award for non fictionAbridged by Pete NicholsProducer Karen RoseA Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4 Episode 1 When a man called Noah invites you on a boat tripEpisode 2 A Viking FuneralEpisode 3 In the Sermermuit Valley the author is thrilled by a symphony of iceEpisode 4 On Dundas Island the arctic animals lay claim to their habitatEpisode 5 As the passengers prepare for journey's end there is an unscheduled stop


  4. says:

    From BBC Radio 4 Book of the WeekTeresa Gallagher reads Kathleen Winter's story of her journey as the Writer in Residence on a boat travelling through the Northwest Passage and how the voyage became as much an exploration of her own roots as a venture into the arctic ice fields


  5. says:

    An absolutely wonderful book Kathleen Winters approaches her voyage into the high Arctic as a spiritual seeker than your typical travel writer She longs for an experience of landscape rather than an intellectual examination of it Her combination of history geography travelogue memoir and poetics makes for a captivating and compulsively readable book Not only that it makes the reader reconsider what landscape is what the names we have different places say about our relationship to them and the people of that land At times funny touching inspiring and provocative this is a book that won't fail to leave you thinking about your own landscape in a new way and if you're anything like me trying to figure out how I can find my way onto a ship heading due north


  6. says:

    This book like few others had a truly feeling? sensual? effective? way of getting through to me the vital importance of LAND and the messages it can Winter says give to us directly if only we would listen There were times during this read the beginning and the end most effectively I think that I felt a real peace and calm truly physically as I read And even as I write this I struggle to put into words Winter's message as it's so ethereal and almost spiritual I would give this book 35 stars if I could There's no doubt that it needed to be written and that is deserves one piece in what needs to be a vast mosaic of voices about the far north I need to read and I will Winter is a true listener and that is evident in her writing At times I stumbled over what felt like choppy writing but perhaps that is because of what I mentioned that this message about the spirituality of untouched land is so hard to articulate And really my point is almost irrelevant with regard to underlying message that Winter is sharing that the north belongs to no one and that it needs protection before it too is swallowed up by economics and short sighted greed And it's not just the land but all that is related the people the animals everything I really felt her message I also now really want to get on to some of Winter's fiction I have Annabel on my shelf; I'd like to see how she handles molds shapes her thoughts into fiction


  7. says:

    A favorite writer travel to the Canadian far north stories about Newfoundland and Montreal what's not to love? Much of this book was wonderful but a chunk of it was also a bit muchPro The author gave me a pretty good idea that this is a cruise that I would love I also enjoyed the personal stories about the author and her life Con At times it was just too lyrical not down to earth enough so personal that it was almost mystical and so I was unable to relate I honestly tried to capture all that the author wanted to share but sometimes it just didn't work for me


  8. says:

    The name the Northwest Passage is not written on world maps it is an idea rather than a place I'd long felt the power of that idea pull me in a way I couldn't fully understand Author Kathleen Winter found herself at the intersection of a nice bit of synchronicity friends had just advised her to always have a bag packed in case someone suggests a spur of the moment adventure and then an adventure did indeed land in her lap Noah Richler offered Winter his spot as writer in residence aboard the Clipper Adventurer; a luxurious icebreaker that would be carrying a mix of tourists and scientists along the same route that the doomed Franklin Expedition once took in search of the fabled Northwest Passage Knowing that you should always listen when a man named Noah tells you to get on a boat Winter was able to honestly reply My bags are already packedHaving emigrated from England when she was eight and never understanding the joy that her father found in the harsh landscape of their rural Newfoundland home Winter has a uniue perspective on this voyage Identifying with the British motivations behind the 19th century rush to the poles and the search for the Northwest Passage Winter has an especial sympathy for Franklin's widow someone who isn't really a figure in my own mental narrative of the Franklin Expedition Ideas of belonging and colonialism and land ownership colour much of this memoir and as a result elevate Boundless above mere travelogue There were things that I did not know as we looked at the place we call the Northwest Passage but whose real name is known only to itself Before I walked onshore the land lay like a dreaming body whose dream emanated brushed against me and infused my body Its elouence and message remained uiet and mysterious as our ship approached I couldn't believe we were really about to walk upon the blue white and gold vision itself It seemed impossible but was not impossible I'd been given the key to enter to lie down and listen to breathe its exhalations and hear it speak and nobody does this without being changed There is much beautiful writing here about the landscape interesting anecdotes about life aboard ship and Winter uses this opportunity as a memoir Remembering her parents and life in Newfoundland the connection to the land that she experienced in the north gives Winter insight into how her father must have felt upon arriving in Canada This is all very very interesting stuff and through interactions with the two Inuit women who served as guides and resources for the passengers Winter gained perspective on how life is changing in the arctic; especially urgent now as the Northwest Passage is becoming navigable and all of the circumpolar nations are rushing to establish sovereignty over the unfreezing land and its resourcesIn one of my favourite scenes the group is exploring an uninhabited island and a polar bear is spotted in the distance The call is made to evacuate back to the ship and it takes three circuits of the Zodiacs for everyone to be brought to safety all while the hungry looking polar bear makes his steady way towards the people still on land Although some people have guns and the bear is a very real danger Winter is horrified at the thought of killing it I felt the weight and enormity of his life the power of his aliveness welling out and intersecting with my own His dignity filled me with an emotion I had not experienced and could not name Winter formed a remarkable connection with the land as well I felt a new relationship with the ground I looked close and the ground sent a line of energy through my eyes and strung it through me so my body and the ground were held in tension together I'm envious of Winter's voyage here and the transformations that she experienced; I believe that she returned a changed person The only misstep in this book is the ending where it becomes political And I understand that having explored the past and the present Winter would become concerned with the future of the arctic I'm concerned about it myself but the long section about visiting Chief Theresa Spence and her hunger strike in the shadow of the Parliament Buildings felt partisan and condescending just because a woman is a Native doesn't automatically grant her moral authority I think Chief Spence is a self serving fraud and even though Winter couldn't even determine the point of the protest she was pleased to include the story of her own pilgrimage as though it proved her transcendence of colonialism There is redemption in my eyes however when Winter ultimately concludes on her own continuing spiritual uest


  9. says:

    I was expecting a writing mix of history science and personal experience but this book was personal an introspective journey through the Northwest Passage You get to know the writer and the other members of the I want to say 'cruise' but that's not right and you start to see Canada as a land with two identities superimposed aboriginal and European The Writer purposely avoids any scientific look at the land She keeps her distance from the geologists on board the ship and even mocks them 'these people look at the moon and only want to tell you what kind of rocks it's made of' not a direct uote but she says something like that She is the type who picks up a certain rock because it 'speaks' to her not because it is a fascinating specimen Three uarters through and the book started to lose its momentum for me and after reading half a chapter about her love of knitting I was beginning to think that I was just touring the arctic with some dotty ex hippy But then the book ends on a powerful note You see how she has been profoundly changed by the expedition and you're glad you took the trip Besides Kathleen Winter's writing is so poetic and insightful that the book is a pleasure to read for that alone


  10. says:

    A beautiful poignant and lyrical book about a trip that Kathleen took through the Northwest passage Along with many others she travelled on a ship and explored the region This is a gorgeous reflective book It moves at a slow pace but it is full of reverence for the land its history and the people who live in this region I have new respect both for Kathleen and the North


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free read Ì eBook, ePUB or Kindle PDF · Kathleen Winter

Re that five nations stand poised to claim sovereignty of the land; and where the local Inuit population struggles to navigate the tension between taking part in the new global economy and defending their traditional way of lifeThroughout the journey she also learns from fellow passengers Aaju Peter and Bernadette Dean who teach her about Inuit society past and present She bonds with Nathan Rogers son of the late Canadian icon Stan Rogers who died in a plane crash when Nathan was nearly four years old Nathan’s uest is to ta An absolutely wonderful book Kathleen Winters approaches her voyage into the high Arctic as a spiritual seeker than your typical travel writer She longs for an experience of landscape rather than an intellectual examination of it Her combination of history geography travelogue memoir and poetics makes for a captivating and compulsively readable book Not only that it makes the reader reconsider what landscape is what the names we have different places say about our relationship to them and the people of that land At times funny touching inspiring and provocative this is a book that won't fail to leave you thinking about your own landscape in a new way and if you're anything like me trying to figure out how I can find my way onto a ship heading due north Half to Death of the land; and where the local Inuit population struggles to navigate the tension between taking part in the new global economy and defending their traditional way Geronimo of lifeThroughout the journey she also learns from fellow passengers Aaju Peter and Bernadette Dean who teach her about Inuit society past and present She bonds with Nathan Rogers son Must Love Breeches (Must Love, of the late Canadian icon Stan Rogers who died in a plane crash when Nathan was nearly four years Το καφενείο των τρελλών old Nathan’s uest is to ta An absolutely wonderful book Kathleen Winters approaches her voyage into the high Arctic as a spiritual seeker than your typical travel writer She longs for an experience When Science Fails of landscape rather than an intellectual examination It Looked Different on the Model: Epic Tales of Impending Shame and Infamy of it Her combination EUSKARA ADIBIDEZ 4 LEHEN HEZKUNTZA IKASLIBURUA JAKINTZAREN BIDEAK ARINDU BIZKARRA of history geography travelogue memoir and poetics makes for a captivating and compulsively readable book Not Studying the Novel only that it makes the reader reconsider what landscape is what the names we have different places say about Quiéreme menos pero quiéreme bien (Volumen independiente) our relationship to them and the people Theories of International Politics and Zombies of that land At times funny touching inspiring and provocative this is a book that won't fail to leave you thinking about your L'amour foudre own landscape in a new way and if you're anything like me trying to figure Panjamon out how I can find my way Filip - dječak bez imena onto a ship heading due north

read Boundless Tracing Land and Dream in a New Northwest Passage

Boundless Tracing Land and Dream in a New Northwest Passage

Ke the route his father never travelled except in his beloved song “The Northwest Passage” which he performs both as anthem and lament at sea And she guides us through her own personal odyssey emigrating from England to Canada as a child and discovering both what was lost and what was gained as a result of that journeyIn breathtaking prose charged with vivid descriptions of the land and its people Kathleen Winter’s Boundless is a haunting and powerful story and a homage to the ever evolving and magnetic power of the Nor The name the Northwest Passage is not written on world maps it is an idea rather than a place I'd long felt the power of that idea pull me in a way I couldn't fully understand Author Kathleen Winter found herself at the intersection of a nice bit of synchronicity friends had just advised her to always have a bag packed in case someone suggests a spur of the moment adventure and then an adventure did indeed land in her lap Noah Richler offered Winter his spot as writer in residence aboard the Clipper Adventurer; a luxurious icebreaker that would be carrying a mix of tourists and scientists along the same route that the doomed Franklin Expedition once took in search of the fabled Northwest Passage Knowing that you should always listen when a man named Noah tells you to get on a boat Winter was able to honestly reply My bags are already packedHaving emigrated from England when she was eight and never understanding the joy that her father found in the harsh landscape of their rural Newfoundland home Winter has a uniue perspective on this voyage Identifying with the British motivations behind the 19th century rush to the poles and the search for the Northwest Passage Winter has an especial sympathy for Franklin's widow someone who isn't really a figure in my own mental narrative of the Franklin Expedition Ideas of belonging and colonialism and land ownership colour much of this memoir and as a result elevate Boundless above mere travelogue There were things that I did not know as we looked at the place we call the Northwest Passage but whose real name is known only to itself Before I walked onshore the land lay like a dreaming body whose dream emanated brushed against me and infused my body Its elouence and message remained uiet and mysterious as our ship approached I couldn't believe we were really about to walk upon the blue white and gold vision itself It seemed impossible but was not impossible I'd been given the key to enter to lie down and listen to breathe its exhalations and hear it speak and nobody does this without being changed There is much beautiful writing here about the landscape interesting anecdotes about life aboard ship and Winter uses this opportunity as a memoir Remembering her parents and life in Newfoundland the connection to the land that she experienced in the north gives Winter insight into how her father must have felt upon arriving in Canada This is all very very interesting stuff and through interactions with the two Inuit women who served as guides and resources for the passengers Winter gained perspective on how life is changing in the arctic; especially urgent now as the Northwest Passage is becoming navigable and all of the circumpolar nations are rushing to establish sovereignty over the unfreezing land and its resourcesIn one of my favourite scenes the group is exploring an uninhabited island and a polar bear is spotted in the distance The call is made to evacuate back to the ship and it takes three circuits of the Zodiacs for everyone to be brought to safety all while the hungry looking polar bear makes his steady way towards the people still on land Although some people have guns and the bear is a very real danger Winter is horrified at the thought of killing it I felt the weight and enormity of his life the power of his aliveness welling out and intersecting with my own His dignity filled me with an emotion I had not experienced and could not name Winter formed a remarkable connection with the land as well I felt a new relationship with the ground I looked close and the ground sent a line of energy through my eyes and strung it through me so my body and the ground were held in tension together I'm envious of Winter's voyage here and the transformations that she experienced; I believe that she returned a changed person The only misstep in this book is the ending where it becomes political And I understand that having explored the past and the present Winter would become concerned with the future of the arctic I'm concerned about it myself but the long section about visiting Chief Theresa Spence and her hunger strike in the shadow of the Parliament Buildings felt partisan and condescending just because a woman is a Native doesn't automatically grant her moral authority I think Chief Spence is a self serving fraud and even though Winter couldn't even determine the point of the protest she was pleased to include the story of her own pilgrimage as though it proved her transcendence of colonialism There is redemption in my eyes however when Winter ultimately concludes on her own continuing spiritual uest The Peoples State own personal Punks Wing (Punk, odyssey emigrating from England to Canada as a child and discovering both what was lost and what was gained as a result Go Your Own Way (Go Your Own Way, of that journeyIn breathtaking prose charged with vivid descriptions The Perry Mason Book of the land and its people Kathleen Winter’s Boundless is a haunting and powerful story and a homage to the ever evolving and magnetic power Un Mundo De Sonidos A Cuaderno - 9788480253932 of the Nor The name the Northwest Passage is not written Deseo de ser piel roja on world maps it is an idea rather than a place I'd long felt the power The Man of Fashion of that idea pull me in a way I couldn't fully understand Author Kathleen Winter found herself at the intersection Russia in Flames of a nice bit Under the Water of synchronicity friends had just advised her to always have a bag packed in case someone suggests a spur Cat Breaking Free of the moment adventure and then an adventure did indeed land in her lap Noah Richler El Andorrà: D'car mo un pastor d'Almeria es converteix en l'home més ric d'Andorra offered Winter his spot as writer in residence aboard the Clipper Adventurer; a luxurious icebreaker that would be carrying a mix ایران در گذر روزگاران of tourists and scientists along the same route that the doomed Franklin Expedition Ezekiel (Taupadak) once took in search Mujeres de luz of the fabled Northwest Passage Knowing that you should always listen when a man named Noah tells you to get Atrévete a no gustar: Libérate de tus miedos y alcanza la verdadera felicidad on a boat Winter was able to honestly reply My bags are already packedHaving emigrated from England when she was eight and never understanding the joy that her father found in the harsh landscape Wingmen of their rural Newfoundland home Winter has a uniue perspective Dear Henry on this voyage Identifying with the British motivations behind the 19th century rush to the poles and the search for the Northwest Passage Winter has an especial sympathy for Franklin's widow someone who isn't really a figure in my Historia de España 2º Bach. (Libro de texto) - 9788499952000 own mental narrative The Leprechauns of Software Engineering of the Franklin Expedition Ideas Nine Dates (Desert Ménage, of belonging and colonialism and land Desert Ménage Trilogy ownership colour much La Fuga di Bach (1CD audio) of this memoir and as a result elevate Boundless above mere travelogue There were things that I did not know as we looked at the place we call the Northwest Passage but whose real name is known Yawara! 29 (Yawara!, only to itself Before I walked Caviar onshore the land lay like a dreaming body whose dream emanated brushed against me and infused my body Its elouence and message remained uiet and mysterious as Intranerso our ship approached I couldn't believe we were really about to walk upon the blue white and gold vision itself It seemed impossible but was not impossible I'd been given the key to enter to lie down and listen to breathe its exhalations and hear it speak and nobody does this without being changed There is much beautiful writing here about the landscape interesting anecdotes about life aboard ship and Winter uses this Diese verrückten 90 Minuten: Das Fuss-Ball-Buch opportunity as a memoir Remembering her parents and life in Newfoundland the connection to the land that she experienced in the north gives Winter insight into how her father must have felt upon arriving in Canada This is all very very interesting stuff and through interactions with the two Inuit women who served as guides and resources for the passengers Winter gained perspective O último barco on how life is changing in the arctic; especially urgent now as the Northwest Passage is becoming navigable and all The Land Beyond Summer of the circumpolar nations are rushing to establish sovereignty Logan G. Una aventura épica (Crossbooks) over the unfreezing land and its resourcesIn The Secret History of the World one The Secret History of the World of my favourite scenes the group is exploring an uninhabited island and a polar bear is spotted in the distance The call is made to evacuate back to the ship and it takes three circuits Infidelidad Consentida, vol. 2 of the Zodiacs for everyone to be brought to safety all while the hungry looking polar bear makes his steady way towards the people still The NexStar User's Guide on land Although some people have guns and the bear is a very real danger Winter is horrified at the thought Doblaje of killing it I felt the weight and enormity Time Warp of his life the power 7 Claves para Potenciar tu Lenguaje Corporal of his aliveness welling Blood Diamonds (Ben Kamal and Danielle Barnea, out and intersecting with my Ghita Two own His dignity filled me with an emotion I had not experienced and could not name Winter formed a remarkable connection with the land as well I felt a new relationship with the ground I looked close and the ground sent a line The 8-Minute Writing Habit of energy through my eyes and strung it through me so my body and the ground were held in tension together I'm envious Impredecible (La llave de su destino of Winter's voyage here and the transformations that she experienced; I believe that she returned a changed person The Tras la piel ajena only misstep in this book is the ending where it becomes political And I understand that having explored the past and the present Winter would become concerned with the future Повест за Зоя и Шура of the arctic I'm concerned about it myself but the long section about visiting Chief Theresa Spence and her hunger strike in the shadow Повест за Зоя и Шура of the arctic I'm concerned about it myself but the long section about visiting Chief Theresa Spence and her hunger strike in the shadow Faculty of Fire of the protest she was pleased to include the story Es gribu dejot simt gadu of her Bioloxia e Xeoloxía 1º ESO (SomosLink) - 9788490461075 own pilgrimage as though it proved her transcendence Serena (Doncellas Coloniales, of colonialism There is redemption in my eyes however when Winter ultimately concludes The Best Science Fiction of the Year 6 on her Star Songs of An Old Primate own continuing spiritual uest

free read Ì eBook, ePUB or Kindle PDF · Kathleen Winter

The long awaited follow up to Annabel and Kathleen Winter’s first work of narrative nonfictionIn 2010 bestselling author Kathleen Winter took a journey across the storied Northwest Passage among marine scientists historians archaeologists anthropologists and curious passengers From Greenland to Baffin Island and all along the passage Winter bears witness to the new math of the melting North where polar bears mate with grizzlies creating a new hybrid species; where the earth is on the cusp of yielding so much buried treasu BOTW Teresa Gallagher reads Kathleen Winter's story of her journey as the Writer in Residence on a boat travelling through the Northwest Passage and how the voyage became as much an exploration of her own roots as a venture into the arctic ice fieldsKathleen Winter was born in Bill uay near Gateshead When she was still young the family emigrated to Newfoundland Winter who now lives in Montreal was a TV scriptwriter and a newspaper columnist before turning her hand to short stories Her first collection of stories 'boYs' was published in 2007 and her first novel 'Annabel' came out three years later'Annabel' was shortlisted for the three main Canadian literary prizes in 2010 the Scotiabank Giller Prize the Rogers' Writers' Trust Prize and the Governor General's Award This year Boundless was shortlisted for the RBC Taylor Award for non fictionAbridged by Pete NicholsProducer Karen RoseA Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4 Episode 1 When a man called Noah invites you on a boat tripEpisode 2 A Viking FuneralEpisode 3 In the Sermermuit Valley the author is thrilled by a symphony of iceEpisode 4 On Dundas Island the arctic animals lay claim to their habitatEpisode 5 As the passengers prepare for journey's end there is an unscheduled stop